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Saturday, 29 July 2017

German oil/chemical tanker Sloman Hera 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 July 2017

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport saint John’s, IMO 9466714, MMSI 305850000 and call sign V2FY3. Owned and managed by Sloman Neptun, Bremen, Germany. Built by Jiangzhou Union Shipbuilding, Rui Chang, China in 2012. 

Chineese bulk carrier An Ning 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 July 2017

Hong Kong/China-flagged, homeport Hong Kong, IMO 9407859, MMSI 477192700 and call sign VREY6. Owned and managed by Cosco HK Shipping, Hong Kong, China. Built by Cisco Nantong Shipyard, Nantong, China in 2009. 

Officers of Dutch ram turret Hr. Ms. Koning der Nederlanden visited the boat lift on Hog Islands, Bombay, British Indies in 1878


Rijksmuseum Amsterdam. Original source


The Dutch ram turret Zr. Ms. Koning der Nederland (1) captain W. Enslie (2) departed on 3 March 1878 towards the Dutch East Indies where she arrived at 6 May 1878 at Atjeh and added to the auxiliary squadron in the Dutch East Indies. From Aden was the next stop at Bombay, British Indies arriving there on 20th April 1878 and departing on the 25th. Accompanied by some of his officers visited the Dutch commanding officer the boat lift on Hog Island (3) where it was possible to lift within 35 minutes warships with the size of the HMS Bellerophon (4) to clean and paint. The lift was owned by the British government but hardly used anymore due to the very strong currents on the location. Building costs 35.000 pound sterling.

Notes
1. The ship was designed by B.J. Tideman before the Noordzeekanaal was available, so it was a comprise between armour, artillery and horsepower. The result was a stern which was to 'full' and forced shaped. Ram turret, call sign GQMB, originally she was to be named Matador, on stocks at the naval yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands 28 November 1871, renamed Koning der Nederlanden on 24 February 1872 (other source claims even 24 April 1874), launched on 28 October 1874, commissioned on 16 February 1877 (other source claims 15 August 1876), transferred to the Indische Militaire Marine in 1894, decommissioned 1 April 1895, in August 1896 started the rebuilding at the naval yard at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies as a guard ship, commissioned on 1 December 1899, stricken in 1914 and became accommodation ship for the crew of the ships which were repaired and later for the submarine force, by Dutch navy personnel at Surabaya set on fire and sunk to prevent capture by the Japanese on 2 March 1942. Dimensions 81.78 (loadline between perpendiculars)-85.24 (over all) x 15.20 (over outside armour)x 5.83/8.93m, 5400 ton displacement , 2 engines with totally 7 boilers supplied 4630 ihp, 2 screws, speed 11,95 knots (on trial 26 July 1877), coal capacity 620 ton, armed with 4-28cm/11” guns , 4-12 cm/4.7” guns, 2-12cm/4.7” howitzers, 1-7cm/2.75” gun, 3-5cm/1.96” guns and 2-12cm/4.7” mortars. The sides were protected by 11,4/12,7cm (ends)-20,3cm/8” thick armour, turrets and turret bulwarks 22,9cm/9” and around the gun holes tot a maximum of 53,4cm/21” thick armour. The crew numbered 250 men. Fitted out with 3 masts. Trial off Texel 26 July 1877. Total costs while being prepared to depart for the first time to sea fl. 3.220,170,00.
2. Willem Enslie (30 June 1825 Brussels, Belgium-25 July 1898 Beek, Netherlands), ending his career in the rank of rear admiral on 1 August 1886.
3. Hog Island lying in the Bombay Harbour was so-called for hogging ships there. The lift was a hydraulic lift of Mr. Edward Clark (1814-1894) of Edwin Clark, Purchard and Comapnyto compensate the lacking of sufficient dock accommodation for cleaning and repairing ships. The remark of the Dutch officer that she was no used is true. She was operated for just months in 1872-1873 for docking the HMS Wolverine, the steamship Sind of the Bombay Marine and the merchant steamships Neera and Sir Bartle Frere.
4. Building ordered n 23 July 1863, laid down at the Chatham Dockyard, England on 28 December 1863, launched on 26 April 1865m completed on 11 April 1869, commissioned in March 1866, training hulk and renamed Indus III in 1904 and sold to be broken up on 12 December 1922. Central battery ironclad designed by Sir Edward Reed. Displacement 7,672 tons and as dimensions 91,4 x 17,1 x 8,1 metres or 300 x 56.1 x 26.7 feet. 

Disciplinary punishment system within the French navy partly changed according to the Dutch magazine Machineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 5

An item reported that in contrary to the past in the French navy the ration wine was supplied despite that fact that a sailor got a disciplinary punishment. Further more was for sailors who were punished for the first time the punishment temporarily suspended or even after 3 months well behaviour stricken (Law Béranger).(1)

Note
1. René Beranger (22 April 1830 Bourg-lès-Valence, France-29 August 1915 Alincourt, France), politician, senator, lawyer and judge. The law referred to dealing with suspended parole was introduced by him in 1891. 

Gunboats for Russian Amur-flotilla ordered to be built according to the Dutch magazine Machineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 5

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht reporting that the Russian navy ordered the building of 20 gunboats fitted out with steam turbine machinery to serve on the Amur river for the border patrol and defence. 

Russian naval commission advices building armoured ships instead of cruisers according to the Dutch magazine Machineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 5

An item referred o the Army and Navy Journal reporting that a special commission of naval experts investigated which kind of warships was really needed by the Russian navy and now handed a report over to the department of navy. Main conclusions were not to built no longer 3.000 en 6.000 tons and more cruisers but instead armoured ships of at least 6.000 tons, heavily armoured and armed with the highest possible speed. Furthermore was the torpedo boat weapon considered to be of high interest. 

Venetian galley Grulla in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the right wing commanded by Don Alvaro de Bazán, marqués de Santa Cruz. Commanded by Nicolo Vidali.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Venetian galley Monte in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the right wing commanded by Don Alvaro de Bazán, marqués de Santa Cruz. Commanded by Andrea Soriano.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Papal galley Pisana in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the right wing commanded by Don Alvaro de Bazán, marqués de Santa Cruz. Commanded by Hércules Balotta.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Venetian galley Leó in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the right wing commanded by Don Alvaro de Bazán, marqués de Santa Cruz. Commanded by Nadal Veniero.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Friday, 28 July 2017

Japanese oil/chemical tanker (ex-High Beam 2009) Jose Progress 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 27 July 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9392391, MMSI 355209000 and call sign 3FPZ2. Ex-High Beam renamed 2009. Owned and managed by Kokuka Sangyo, Tokyo, Japan. Built by Shin Kurushima Onishi Shipyard, Imabari, Japan in 2009. 

Dutch general cargo ship Leonie 2007-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 27 July 2017

Netherlands-flagged. homeport Spijk, Netherlands, IMO 9331361, MMSI 244772000 and call sign PHLE. Built by Peters Shipyard, Kampen, Netherlands in 2007,  Owned and managed by Van Dam Scheepvaart, Spijk, Netherlands. 

American ro-ro/container ship Atlantic Sky 2017-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 27 July 2017

United Kingdom-flagged, homeport Liverpool, England, IMO 9670602, MMSI 235117615 and cal sign 2JOM5. Built by Hudong Zhonghua Shipbuilding Group, Shanghai, China and Hudong Zhonghua H1698A in 2017. Owned and managed by Atlantic Container Line, Westfield, New Jersey, USA. 

Japanese bulk carrier AOM Julia 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 27 July 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9544695, MMSI 355891000 and call sign 3FNQ3. Owned and managed by Toshin Kisen, Imabari, Japan. Bult by Shin Kasado Dockyard, Kudamatsu, Japan in 2009. 

Dutch ro-ro cargo ship Bothniaborg 2004-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 27 July 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Delfzijl, Netherlands, IMO 9267728, MMSI 245656000 and call sign PBIO. Owned and managed by Wagenborg Shipping, Delfzijl, Netherlands. Built by Volharding Shipyard, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 2004. 

British protected cruiser 1st class HMS Blenheim 1888-1926

Orlando-class

Blake-class

Edgar-class

Part of the Blake-class consisting of the Blake and Blenheim, preceded by the Orlando-class and succeeded by the Edgar-class. Designed under Director of Naval Construction William White. Laid down by Thames Ironworks&Shipbuilding Company, lea mouth, London in October 1888, launched on 5 July 1890, commissioned on 1 January 1891, destroyer depot ship since 1908, decommissioned in 1926 and sold to be broken up on 13 July 1926 which was executed the same year at Pembroke Dock. 

Displacement 9.150 tons and as dimensions 114,30 (between perpendiculars)-121,84 (over all) x 19,81 x 7,32 metres or 375-399.9 x 65 x 24 feet. Machinery consisted of 4-3 cylinder triple expansion steam engines with 6 double-ended cylindrical boilers delivering via 2-shafts 13.000 ihp (natural draught)-20.000 ihp (forced draught) resulting in a speed of 20 (natural draught)-22 (forced draught). With a coal bunker capacity of 1.800 tons was the range 15.000 (designed)-10.000 (actual) miles. Crew numbered 570 men. Armour consisted of a 76mm/3”-15,2cm/6” thick deck, 11cm/4.5” thick gunshields with the conning tower protected by 30cm/12”. The armament consisted of 2x1-23,4cm/9.2” Mk VI breech loading guns, 10-16,2cm/6” quick firing guns, 16-4,7cm/3pd Hotchkiss quick firing guns and 4-35,6cm/14” torpedo tubes (2 submerged, 2 surfaced above the waterline). 

British protected cruiser 1st class HMS Blake 1888-1922

Orlando-class

Blake-class

Edgar-class

Part of the Blake-class consisting of the Blake and Blenheim, preceded by the Orlando-class and succeeded by the Edgar-class. Designed under Director of Naval Construction William White. Laid down at the Chatham Dockyard in July 1888, launched on 23 November 1889. Troop transport in 1901, destroyer depot ship since 1907, in the First World War serving for the 11th Destroyer Flotilla and sold to be broken up on 9 June 1922.

Displacement 9.150 tons and as dimensions 114,30 (between perpendiculars)-121,84 (over all) x 19,81 x 7,32 (normal)-7,6 (maximum) metres or 375-399.9 x 65 x 24-25 feet. Machinery consisted of 4-3 cylinder triple expansion steam engines with 6 double-ended cylindrical boilers delivering via 2-shafts 13.000 ihp (natural draught)-20.000 ihp (forced draught) resulting in a speed of 20 (natural draught)-22 (forced draught). With a coal bunker capacity of 1.800 tons was the range 15.000 (designed)-10.000 (actual) miles. Crew numbered 570 men. Armour consisted of a 76mm/3”-15,2cm/6” thick deck, 11cm/4.5” thick gunshields with the conning tower protected by 30cm/12”. The armament consisted of 2x1-23,4cm/9.2” Mk VI breech loading guns, 10-16,2cm/6” quick firing guns, 16-4,7cm/3pd Hotchkiss quick firing guns and 4-35,6cm/14” torpedo tubes (2 submerged, 2 surfaced above the waterline). As a destroyer depot ship was her armament reduced to 4-15,2cm/6” guns and 2-10,2cm/4” guns. 

British protected cruiser HMS Terrible 1894-1920 and training school Fisgard III 1920-1932

HMS Edgar-class

HMS Powerful-class

Diadem-class

HMS Diadem

Part of the Powerful-class consisting of the Powerful and Terrible, preceded by the Edgar-class and succeeded by the Diadem-class. Especially designed to act against commerce raiders as the armoured cruisers of the French navy and the Russian Rurik. The design dimensions were limited by the at that time available shipyards large enough to built and maintain both ships. Laid down by J.&G. Thomson, Clydebank, Scotland in 1894, launched on 27 May 1895, renamed as training school Fisgard III in August 1920 and sold to be broken up in July 1932. 

Displacement 14.400 (deep load) tons and as dimensions 152,4 (between perpendiculars)-164,o x 21,6 x 8,2 metres or 500-538 x 71 x 27 feet. The machinery consisted of 2 vertical triple expansion steam engines and 48 Belleville water tube boilers supplying via 2 shafts 25.000 shp allowing a speed of 22 9design) knots and with 14 knots a range of 7.000 nautical miles. Speed during 4 hours trial with forced draught and a horsepower of 25.572 ihp was 22,4 knots and during 30 hours natural draught with 18.493 ihp 20,96 knots. Crew numbered 894 men. Armour consisted of a 5,1cm/2”-15,2cm/6” thick deck and further more 15,2cm/6” thick barbettes and gunshields. The armament consisted of 2-23,4cm/9,2” Mk VIII breech loading guns, 12-15,2cm/6” quick firing guns, 16-7,6cm/3”/12pd guns, 12 4,7cm/3pd guns and 4 submerged torpedo tubes. 

British protected cruiser HMS Powerful 1894-1919 and training school Impregnable 1919-1929

HMS Edgar-class

HMS Powerful-class

Diadem-class

HMS Diadem

Part of the Powerful-class consisting of the Powerful and Terrible, preceded by the Edgar-class and succeeded by the Diadem-class. Especially designed to act against commerce raiders as the armoured cruisers of the French navy and the Russian Rurik. The design dimensions were limited by the at that time available shipyards large enough to built and maintain both ships. Laid down by Vickers Limited, Barrow-in-Furness, England in 1894, launched on 24 July 1895, renamed Impregnable as training school in November 1919 and sold to be broken up on 31 August 1929. 

Displacement 14.400 (deep load) tons and as dimensions 152,4 (between perpendiculars)-164,o x 21,6 x 8,2 metres or 500-538 x 71 x 27 feet. The machinery consisted of 2 vertical triple expansion steam engines and 48 Belleville water tube boilers supplying via 2 shafts 25.000 shp allowing a speed of 22 9design) knots and with 14 knots a range of 7.000 nautical miles. Speed during 4 hours trial with forced draught and a horsepower of 25.866 ihp was 21,18 knots in bad weather conditions and during 30 hours natural draught with 18.433 ihp 20,6 knots. Crew numbered 894 men. Armour consisted of a 5,1cm/2”-15,2cm/6” thick deck and further more 15,2cm/6” thick barbettes and gunshields. The armament consisted of 2-23,4cm/9,2” Mk VIII breech loading guns, 12-15,2cm/6” quick firing guns, 16-7,6cm/3”/12pd guns, 12 4,7cm/3pd guns and 4 submerged torpedo tubes. 

German light cruiser Leipzig 1928-1946

Leipzig

Nürnberg

Of the Leipzig-class consisting of the Leipzig and Nürnberg, preceded by the Königsberg-class and succeeded by the never realized M-class. The Nürnberg was not 100% similar with her sister ship. Laid down by Kriegsmarinewerft, Wilhelmshaven, Germany on 28 April 1928, launched on 18 October 1929, commissioned on 8 October 1931, heavily damaged and not repaired after a collision with the German heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen in October 194, against the end of the Second World War serving as a barracks ship for minesweeping forces and scuttled in July 1946.

Displacement 8.100 tons and as dimensions 177 x 16,3 x 5,69 metres ot 580.9 x 53.6 x 18.8 feet. The machinery consisted of 2 steam turbines delivering 60.000 shp and 4-7 cylinder 2 stroke double acting MAN diesels supplying 12.400 ihp allowing a speed of 32 knots and with a speed of 10 knots was her range 3.900 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 524 men (included 26 officers0. Armour consisted of a 5cm/2.0 thick belt, a 3cm/1.2” thick deck with the conning tower protected by 10cm/3.9”. The original armament consisted of 3x3-15cm/5.9” C/25 quick firing guns, 2x1-8.8cm/3.46” L/45 quick firing anti aircraft guns, 4x3-50cm/20” torpedo tunes and 120 mines. Able to carry 2 Arado 196 floatplanes with her. 

The Romanian navy and harbour of Constanza, Romania according to a Dutch naval report in 1926


The Dutch coastal defence ship Hr. Ms. Tromp (1) commanded by captain N.J. van Laer left on 6 October 1926 Nieuwediep, Netherlands for a voyage towards the Mediterranean and the Black Sea.

In November visited the Tromp Constanza which was described as large harbour although again less busy as before the war. Most important export products were grain and petrol; de later nowadays more as bulk than in cans. This was caused by the Turkish and Greek government petrol monopolies and founding their own cans plants. Wayer was enough available but no coals. When it was reported that at Syracuse no coal could be bunkered, managed the Dutch commanding officer to buy at Constanza 200 ton Silesian coal enough for the voyage towards Algiers. The coal bunkering went extremely slow. At 13.00 o’clock was just 112 tons loaded. After the support of 30 Dutch sailors were all the coal loaded at 15:30 o’clock. In the harbour were two Romanian destroyers (2) lying out of service and some torpedo boats and gunboats. The Romanian navy commanding officer, a rear admiral, was called towards Bucharest and in his place acted the director of the scolo navala, a captain. He complimented the Dutch commanding officer. An officer of the serving gunboats proposed to forget the official visits while the boats mainly served as training ships as part of the scolo navala. Romanian midshipmen were allowed to visit the Tromp.


Notes
1. Coast defence ship Marten Harpertsz Tromp, often referred to as just Tromp. She was laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands 2 May 1903, launched 15 June 1904, trial 17 November 1905 and commissioned 5 April 1906. The armament consisted of 2-24cm guns, 4-15cm guns, 8-7.5cm guns, 4-3.7cm guns, one submerged torpedo tube and two submerged torpedo guns. After some voyages for instance again towards the Dutch East Indies was she decommissioned 2 May 1927, stricken 1932 and leaving 6 December 1933 Den Helder towards Pernis to be broken up. Part of her armour was used to strengthen in 1933 the fortress Kijk Uit at Den Helder, Netherlands.
2. This must be the Marasti-class destroyers Marasti (ex-Sparviero and ex-Vartej), launched on 26 March 1917 and the Marasesti (ex-Nibbio and ex-Viscal), launched on 30 January 1918.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1926-1927. 

Dutch screw steamship 1st class Zr. Ms. Koningin Emma der Nederlanden visited the harbour of Savanilla, Columbia in January 1888

As accommodation ship

In the period 1 October 1887-1 October 1888 was the Dutch screw steamship 1st class Zr. Ms. Koningin Emma der Nederland (1) captain J.H. Commijs stationed at Curacao, Dutch East Indies. During this period were several islands in the Caribbean and further more Columbia visited.

On 21 January 1888 arrived she at Savanilla, Columbia. In his report dated described her commanding officer the harbour and the political situation in Columbia. The bay of Savinilla silted rapidly and the stores from the steamships were overloaded into large iron prows towed by tugs towards the station Salgar. Despite their swallow draught was even for these small vessels difficult to get to the wooden jetties. From there were the stores loaded on the train towards Barranquilla. This railway line was very important while transporting around 2.000 tons weekly. Almost all stores transported over the Magdalena river were via this railway line towards Savanilla transported. In the past belonged the railway line for the government but was in the meantime sold to Francisco Kisneros of Cuba. The officers of the Dutch warship were allowed to travel free by train as appreciation for the support in 1885 by the Dutch Zr. Ms. Atjeh for salvaging prows smashed on the sandbanks during heavy weather. The railway line was now constructing a jetty with a length of 600 feet stretching into the sea to a depth of 30 feet and transversely a part with a lent of 500 feet to be used for the boats. The intention was to sue this new harbour since April 1888. The mouths of the Magdalena river were very difficult to use caused by continuously changing of the depth and far from reliable surveying. In February 1888 was a canal of 15 feet available. On the Magdalena-river were sternwheelers used similar to the ones in the USA. The largest had a displacement of 120 tons with a draught of 4 feet. The smaller ones had a draught of 2-3 feet and could go upwards the river over a distance of almost 600 miles. Shipping on this river was quite often a risky business and the company had a compensation for this purpose of 30.000 dollars. Totally were 20 steamboats active.

Early in the morning of the 26th was the harbour departed underway towards Cartagena, Columbia.

Note
1. also called frigate, call sign GQMF, on stocks as De Ruyter at the naval yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 6 November 1876, completed for the half on 31 October 1876, renamed Koningin Emma der Nederlanden on 7 January 1879, launched on 20 January 1879, commissioned on 1 December 1881, decommissioned on 22 May 1896 for repairs, commissioned on 16 June 1897, decommissioned on23 June 1900, converted at the shipyard De Lastdrager at Den Helder, Netherlands into an accommodation ship in 1908, commissioned on 16 November 1908, guard ship at Willemsoord, Netherlands in 1920, captured by the German forces at Willemsoord on 14 May 1940, capsized and sunk at Den Helder in 1942, salvaged in April 1943 and scuttled north of Fort Harssens, displacement 3.160 ton and as dimensions 80,00-91,85 x 12,50 x 6,10 metres, horsepower 2.732hp/450 nhp, speed 14,10 miles, one double bladed screw with a diameter of 4,88 metres, sail area 1.585 square metres, coal bunker capacity 325 ton for 5ive days full speed, iron built wood planked although the hull above the waterline and some other parts were made of steel to be able to increase the ammunition and coalbunker capacity, her crew numbered 200 men and the armament consisted of 6-17cm guns and 4-12cm guns. The engines and boilers were manufactured by the Koninklijke Fabriek van Stoom- en andere werktuigen at Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1887-1888. 

Armoured warships and destroyers for Russian Black Sea Fleet ordered to be built according to the Dutch magazine Machineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 5

An item referred to the magazine Rundschau reporting that the Russian department of navy ordered the building of 2-12.000 ton armoured ships for the Black Sea Fleet at the naval yards at Nikolajeff and Sevastopol. The machinery was to be made by private owned yards. Furthermore was the building ordered of 3-350 ton destroyers and a speed of 26 miles of the Zavidin and Zavietin type, also to be added to the Black Sea Fleet. 

Japanese navy ordered building of battleships in England according to the Dutch magazine Machineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 5

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht reporting that Japan ordered in England the building of 3 battleships of the King Edward VII ton design with a displacement of 16.000 tons, a horsepower of 18.000 ihp and a speed of 18,25 miles.(1) Next year was in Japan to be started with the building of 3-.11.000 ton protected cruisers and a speed of 22,5 miles and 2-5.000 ton protected cruisers.

Notes
1. The last pre-dreadnought battleships built in England were the Kashima and Katori, part of the Katori-class, preceded by the by Vickers, England in 1899-1902 built Mikasa and succeeded by the in Japan built Satsuma-class battleships. The Katori-class battleships were indeed an improved-modified British King Edward VII-class battleships with a displacement of 16.206-16.646 tons. Katori laid down by Vickers, Barrow-in-Furness on 27 April 1904, launched on 4 July 1905, completed on 20 May 1906 and finally sold to be broken up in April 1924 and the Kashima laid down by Armstrong, Elswick, England on 29 February 1904, launched on 22 March 1905, completed on 23 May 1906 and broken up between 1924-1925. 

Papal galley Santa Maria in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the right wing commanded by Don Alvaro de Bazán, marqués de Santa Cruz. Commanded by Pandulfo Strozi.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Venetian galley San José in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the right wing commanded by Don Alvaro de Bazán, marqués de Santa Cruz. Commanded by Nicolo Donado.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Spanish galley Constanza in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the right wing commanded by Don Alvaro de Bazán, marqués de Santa Cruz. Of Naples. Commanded by Francisco Hernández de Perea.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Venetian galley Aguila in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the right wing commanded by Don Alvaro de Bazán, marqués de Santa Cruz. Commanded by Francisco de Molina.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Venetian galley Cristo in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the right wing commanded by Don Alvaro de Bazán, marqués de Santa Cruz. Commanded by Simón Goro.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Thursday, 27 July 2017

Belgian crude oil tanker (ex-Zaliv Anadyr 2009-2013) Stride 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 July 2017

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9418482, MMSI 566907000 and call sign 9V2096. Owned by Transpetrol Maritime Services, Brussels, Belgium and managed by Transpetrol TM, Asker, Norway. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 2009. Ex-Zaliv Anadyr renamed on 24 April 2013. As Zaliv Anadyr Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol. 

British oil/chemical tanker (ex-Isil D 2007, Shine Dee 2007-2011) Bomar Mars 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 July 2017

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9377030, MMSI 256784000 and call sign 9HCM9. Ex-Isil D renamed September 2007 and Shine Dee renamed January 2011. Owned and managed by Borealis Maritime, London, United Kingdom. Built by Torgem Shipbuilding Industry&Trade, Istanbul, Turkey in 2007. 

Netherlands general cargo ship (ex-Flinter Wave 2004-2011) Wave 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 July 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Heerenveen, Netherlands, IMO 9313785, MMSI 246264000 and call sign PHBZ. Ex-Flinter wave renamed January 2011. Owned and managed by Flinter, Barendrecht, Netherands. Built by Ferus Smit Scheepswerf, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 2004. 

Danish oil/chemical tanker (ex-Pertiwi 2006-2012) FSL New York 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 July 2017

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9340453, MMSI 56174000 and call sign 9VBQ8. Ex-Pertiwi renamed March 2012. Owned and managed by Nordic Tankers Management, Copenhagen, Denmark. Built by Usuki Shipbuilding, Usuki, Japan in 2006. 

Singapore oil/chemical tanker BW Wren 2016-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 July 2017

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9713856, MMSI 563889000 and call sign 9V2927. Built by SPP Shipbuilding Goseong Shipyard, Donghae, South Korea as the SPP Goseong S1184 in 2016, Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia and owned and managed by Metrostar Management, Athens, Greece (according to maritime connector). According toq88 owned by BW Clearwater Pte. Ltd. and managed by BW Fleet Management Pte. Ltd. 

Taiwan crude oil tanker FMPC P Hero 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 July 2017

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 9457610, MMSI 636015252 and call sign A8ZN2. Owned and managed by Formosa Plastics Marine, Taipei, Taiwan. Built by Sasebo Heavy Industries, Sasebo, Japan in 2011. 

Chinese container ship CSCL Venus 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 July 2017

Hong Kong/China-flagged, homeport Hong Kong, IMO 9467251, MMSI 477266800 and call sign VRIE8. Owned by China Shipping Container Lines and managed by China International Shipmanagement, both of Shanghai, China. Built by Samsung Shipbuilding&Heavy Industries, Geoje, South Korea in 2011. 

German general cargo ship (ex-Beluga Progression 2011) HHL Lagos 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 July 2017

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport Saint John’s, IMO 9448358, MMSI 305702000 and call sign V2FK4. Ex-Beluga Progression renamed August 2011. Owned and managed by Hansa Heavy Lift, Hamburg, Germany. 

Dutch tug (ex-Multratug 3 2010-2012, Smit Lion 2012-?) Multratug 3

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 July 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Terneuzen, Netherlands. IMO 9537408, MMSI 24489-607 and call sign PCDB. Built by Damen Shipyard Gorinchem, Gorinchem, Netherlands in 2010. According to Maritime connector ex-Multratug 3 renamed July 2012 Smit Lion owned by Smit International. Rotterdam, Netherlands, managed by URS België, Antwerp, Belgium, Belgium-flagged, homeport Zeebrugge, Belgium and MMSI 205636000. Gross tonnage 484 tons, net tonnage 145 tons, deadweight 276 tons and as dimensions 29,55 (between perpendiculars)-32,14 (over all) x 13,29 (over all) x 6,31 (maximum) metres. Maximum bollard pull 94,7 tons. Speed 13, 7 knots. Owned and managed by Multraship Towage&Salvage, Terneuzen, Netherlands. 

Norwegian barge UR902 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 July 2017

Norway-flagged. Of the J.J. Ugland Companjes. Built by Dalian Shipyard in 013.
Dimensions 300 (over all) x 90 x 20 (depth) feet and 1,337 (light forward)-4,84 (loaded) metres, deadweight 9.019 tons, lightship 2.457 tons, deck area 2.508 square metres and deck unit load 30 tons/square metre. Signal letters LG7252. 

Tug MTS Vanguard 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 July 2017

St. Vincent&Grenadines-flagged, homeport Kingstown, IMO 9688673, MMSI 375007000 and call sign J8B5082. Owned and managed by Marine&Towage Services (MTS). Damen 3209 Shoalbuster.  Built by Damen Shipyards Hardinxveld, Hardinxveld-Giessendam, Netherlands in 2014. Maximum bollard pull 50,5 tons. Horsepower 3.500 bhp. Maximum speed 11,5 knots. Gross tonnage 327 tons, summer deadweight 222 tons and as dimensions 32,27 (over all) x 9,35 (over all) c 3,60 (depth at sides) x 3,3o metres. 

German LPG tanker Danubegas 1998-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 July 2017

Germany-flagged, homeport Leer, Germany, IMO 9176125, MMSI 211280810 and call sign DBOM. Built by Santierul Naval Severnav, Severin, Romania in 1998. Owned by Chemgas Schiffahrt and managed by Hartmann Reederei, Leer, Germany

Russian general cargo ship Kapitan Mironov 1995-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 6 July 2017

In 2017 Russia-flagged, IMO 9077563, MMSI 273383610 and call sign UBWN6. In 2016 Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9077563, Registration number 922794, MMSI 249620000 and call sign 9HXJ4. Built at the Vyborg Shipyard, Vyborg, Russia with yard number 202 on 21 July 1995. Owned and managed by NB Maritime Management, Limassol, Cyprus (shipspotting) or Shipline Three Limited, Valletta, Malta (Russian Maritime Register). 

US Navy building smaller battleships than first intended according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1916-1917 no. 7

Tennessee-class

Colorado-class

An item referred to the Shipping Illustrated that the despite the intention of the US Navy to built 36.000 tons with a main armament of 10-40,6cm guns was in 1916 chosen for 4-32.000 ton battleships with a main armament of 8-40,6cm guns. The reason for this decision was that the ships would more be like the California-class (1) which resulted in a smaller building time than when chosen was for a new design.

Note
1. The Tennessee-class consisted of the California and Tennessee with a displacement of 33.723 tons and a main armament of 12-35,6cm/14”/50 cal guns built between 1916-1921, succeeded by the Colorado-class consisting of the Colorado, Maryland, West Virginia and the never completed Washington, built between 1917-1924 with a displacement of 33.600 tons (32.600 long tons) and an armament of 4x2-40,6cm/16”/45 cal guns. 

Anti torpedo boat battery of USS Arizona almost always usable according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1916-1917 no. 7

Pennsylvania-class



An item referred to the Scientific American dated 25 November 1916 reporting that also the Arizona (1) was fitted out with a central fire-control system. While at older ships the anti torpedo battery was mounted on a relative low vessel, was this on board of the Arizona with the battery on such a high level that she could be used under almost every weather conditions.

Note
1. Part of the Pennsylvania-class consisting of the Pennsylvania and Arizona, preceded by the Nevada-class and succeeded by the New Mexico-class. To be built under the 1913 fiscal year was a design asked with 4x3-14” guns, 22-12,7cm/5” guns and a speed of 21 knots and a armour comparable with that of the Nevada-class. At least 10 preliminary designs were proposed of which the 7th was chosen and further worked out. Building ordered on 4 March 1913, laid down at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on 16 March 1914, launched on 19 June 1915, commissioned on 17 October 1916, modernized at the New York Navy Yard in 1929-1931, including replacing her turbines, sunk during the Japanese aircraft on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii on 7 December 1941, decommissioned on 20 December 1941 and stricken on 1 December 1942. Her wrecks is still visible. The anti torpedo boat battery consisted of 22x1-12,7cm/5”/51 guns. 

British Royal Navy designed 45,7cm/18” gun according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1916-1917 no. 7

An item referred to the Scientific American dated 14 October [1916] reporting that American sources believed that the British Royal Navy succeeded in designing a 45,7cm/18” gun to be mounted on the newest battleships. 

Spanish galley Marquesa in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the right wing commanded by Don Alvaro de Bazán, marqués de Santa Cruz. Of Naples. Commanded by Juan de Simancas.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Spanish galley Bazana in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the right wing commanded by Don Alvaro de Bazán, marqués de Santa Cruz. Of Naples. Commanded by Juan Pérez de Morillo.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Spanish galley Tirana in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the right wing commanded by Don Alvaro de Bazán, marqués de Santa Cruz. Of Naples. Commanded by Juan de Rivadeneyra.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Spanish galley Renegada in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the right wing commanded by Don Alvaro de Bazán, marqués de Santa Cruz. Of Naples. Commanded by Pedro de Urbina.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Spanish galley Capitana of Naples in 1572

Part of the Holy League fleet commanded by Don Juan de Austria gathered off Gumenizas on 9 September 1572. Part of the right wing commanded by Don Alvaro de Bazán, marqués de Santa Cruz.

Source
Armada española desde la union de los reinos de castilla y aragon. C. Fernandez Duro, volume 2, 1896, 176-180. 

Tuesday, 25 July 2017

Boiler explosion on board of British protected cruiser HMS Blake according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 7


An item referred to the Mittheilungen dated October 1903 reporting that on board of the British 9.150 tons cruiser 1st class Blake (speed 21,5 miles) during the manoeuvres of the X-fleet a boiler exploded one stoker and with 4 stokers badly burned by the steam and boiling water. Two of them later died due to their wounds.(1)

Note
1. Part of the Blake-class protected cruisers, .consisting of the Blake and Blenheim, preceded by the Orlando-class and succeeded by the Edgar-class. Laid down at the Chatham Dockyard, England in July 1888m launched on 23 November 1889, destroyer depot ship since 1907 and sold to be broken up on 9 June 1922. Her machinery consisted of 4-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 6 double-ended cylindrical boilers.

French torpedo boat No. 79 heavily damaged after hitting the rock Ourial according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine Mitteilungen reporting that during the torpedo boat manoeuvres the French torpedo boat No. 79, part of the mobile defence of Lorient, France, hit the rock Ourial, With a bended bow and water streaming into the sailors accommodation could she thanks to the watertight bulheads kept floating and be brought towards Brest, France. 

Wireless telegraphy courses for German naval officers and engineers according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 7

An item referred to the Ueberall reported that for Germen naval officers and naval engineers in the coming winter 10 courses each on 14 days in wireless telegraphy were organized. 

British Admiralty wanted to establish torpedo boat station on the Isle of Man according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1903-1904 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine Rundschau reporting that the British admiralty intended to establish at Ramsay (1)on the Isle of Man a torpedo boat station.

Note
1. Coastal town in the north of this island. 

German bulk carrier DS Charme 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 13 July 2017

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 9546904, MMSI 636092229 and call sign A8YW7. Owned by DS Tankers and managed by DS Schiffahrt, both of Hamburg, Germany. Built by Jiangsu Rongsheng Heavy Industries, Rugao, China in 2011. 

Dutch LPG tanker Bayamo 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 July 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands, IMO 9655004, MMSI 245669000 and call sign PCMA. Owned and managed by Chemgas Shipping, Rotterdam. Built by Shipyard Construction Hoogezand, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 2013. 

Oil/chemical tanker (ex-Jo Larix 2014)-2017) Stolt Larix 2017-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 July 2017

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 9617650, MMSI 636017839 and call sign D5MY3. Owned by Stolt-Nielsen Limited. As the Jo Larix, Norway International Register-flagged, MMSI 257944000 and call sign LAPQ7. Built by Mingde Heavy Industry, Nantong, China with hull number 160 (November 2012) in 2014? Owned and managed by Jo Tankers Bergen, Kokstad, Norway.