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Monday, 15 January 2018

Brazilian oil products tanker (ex-Verona I 2006-2010) FSL Singapore 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 13 January 2018

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9311725, MMSI 564187000 and call sign 9VVN2. Ex-Verona I renamed June 2010. Owned by Petrobras, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and managed by Columbia Shipmanagement Singapore, Singapore. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2006. 

French Tourville-class battleships to be fitted out with a Janney-gear for rotating the gun turrets according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1914-1915 no. 3

Lyon-class

An item referred to the Mitteilungen aus dem Gebiete des Seewesens reporting that the French Tourville-class battleships were to be fitted out with a so-called Janney gear making it possible to convert electric power into hydraulic for rotating the gun turrets.(1)

Note
1. The Lyon-class consisting of the Lyon, Lille, Duquesne and Tourville which was an improved Normandie-class but cancelled when the First World War broke out. The Dunkerque-class of the 1930’s were in fact the successors of the Normandie-class. 

Former French monitor Fulminant to be broken up in the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 4

An item reported that the former French target ship Fulminant which was sold to the Dutch firm Jan van Rijsdijk, Hendrik Ido Ambacht, Netherlands was towed to the Netherlands to be broken up was berthed for some time at the quay of the super phosphate plant Holland at Pernis, Netherlands. One of the editors of the Dutch magazine was permitted to visit the ship. The Fulminant with a displacement of 5.651 tons was a so-called citadel ship with just one gun turret (with 2-27cm guns) in the middle of the ship. She was deep lying in the water and resembled a large armoured monitor except for the turret hardly proving a surfaced target. The turret was extreme large. Despite looking for it were no special alterations for her new task as target ship found. All what could be removed from the superstructures lake deck houses was already removed. Underway towards the Netherlands and on the river Maas was the breaking up continued/ Regarded the condition of armour belt and turret had she been the target of a large number of gun exercises with as only results visible blows in the 30-33cm thick old armour. Visible was also that the deck with a bam of 17 metres many times was hit. The all over conclusion however was that all these exercises did not damaged the ship self. Apparently were during exercises also modern armour piercing shells although with reduced explosives filling used while large pieces of the armour were smashed away. The editor got the impression that if the turret had been not so corroded she still could have been turned despite the fact that very close nearby a shell pierced the outside board armour and exploded behind it. The Fulminant was already replaced by a new old ironclad although better armoured. He hoped that within short time the Royal Netherlands Navy also could exercise using old warships as targets. There were enough suitable target ships available and if not, the earlier mentioned firm bought regularly old warships in the United Kingdom, USA and elsewhere.

Note
1. Belonged to the Tonnerre-class with as sister ship the Tonnerre. This single turret (1x2-10’8” guns) breastwork monitor was laid in January 1875 at Cherbourg, launched in August two years later, completed in 1882 and finally stricken in 1908. 

Brazilian steam tanker (ex-Florianopolis) Ivahy was sold in Brazil to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 November 1936

An item reported that the Brazilian steam tanker (ex-Florianopolis) Ivahy of 1.491 gross and 985 net tons and  built by Gebr. Pot, Bolnes, Netherlands in 1912 was sold by the Cia. Commercio e Navagacao, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil to be broken up. 

Dutch steam trawler (ex-Argo) Fram sold to be broken up in the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 29 May 1936

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler (ex-Argo) Fram of 174 tons gross register tonnage, built in 1903 by Smith’s Dock Cp. Ltd., North-Shields, England was sold by the Reederij Erenst&Weimar, Ijmuiden, Netherlands to a Dutch company to be broken up. 

Dutch motor tug Lohengrin launched at Alkmaar, Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 2 October 1936

An item reported the successful launching of the Dutch motor tug Lohengrin by the Scheepswerf en Machinefabriek ‘t Hondsbosch voorheen C. Bosman, Alkaamr, Netherlands with yard number 704 for account of the Bataafsche Petroleum Maatschappij to be used in the Dutch East Indies. She was to be fitted out with 1-40hp 2 cylinder Kromhout diesel. Sister ship was Tristan built by the same shipyard. 

Steamship (ex-Helder, Sirius, Madura) Arctic Prince sold to the Soviet Union and renamed Komsomoltez Arktiki according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 2 October 1936

An item reported that the steamship (ex-Helder, Sirius, Madura) Arctic Prince of 3.450 and 2.310 net tons was sold to the Soviet Union and renamed Komsomoltez Arktiki. Built in 1907 by the Nederlandsche Scheepsbouw Maatschappij, Amsterdam, Netherlands. 

Belgian twin screw steamship Topaze sold to the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 2 October 1936

An item reported that via intermediation of shipbrokers Jacques Pierot Jr.&Zonen, Rotterdam, Netherlands the Belgian twin screw steamship Topaze of 634 gross tons built by the Société Anonyme J. Cockerill, Hoboken, Belgium and owned by the Société Anonyme John Cockerill, Seraing, Belgium was sold to the N.V. Holland Scheepswerf en Machinefabriek, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Belgian twin screw steamship Rubis sold to the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 2 October 1936

An item reported that via intermediation of shipbrokers Jacques Pierot Jr.&Zonen, Rotterdam, Netherlands the Belgian twin screw steamship Rubis of 634 gross tons built by the Société Anonyme J. Cockerill, Hoboken, Belgium and owned by the Société Anonyme John Cockerill, Seraing, Belgium was sold to the N.V. Holland Scheepswerf en Machinefabriek, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

German crude oil tanker HS Tosca 2004-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 13 January 2018

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9288851, MMSI 229272000 and call sign 9HA3190. Owned and managed by V.Ships Germany, Hamburg, Germany. Built by Samsung Shipbuilding&Heavy Industries, Geoje, South Korea in 2004. 

Singapore oil tanker (ex-Arctic Char 2010-2015) Hafnia Arctic 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 14 January 2018

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9332640, MMSI 566230000 and call sign 9V3326. Ex-Arcti Char renamed 19 February 2015. Delivered by Brodosplit, Split, Croatia on 12 January 2010. Registered owner Hafnia Tanker Shipholding 2 Singapore Pte. Ltd., Singapore, technically operated by Donnely Tankers Management Ltd., Athens, Greece and commercially operated by Strait Tankers Pte. Ltd. As agent to desponent owner, Singapore. 

British trawler Raven sold to the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 November 1936

An item reported that the British trawler Raven of about 200 gross tons was sold by the Hull Steam Fishing&Ice Company Limited, Hull, England to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. She was expected to arrive on short notice coming from Hull. 

British trawler Beatrice sold to the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 November 1936

An item reported that the British trawler Beatrice of about 200 gross tons was sold by the Hull Steam Fishing&Ice Company Limited, Hull, England to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. She was expected to arrive on short notice coming from Hull. 

Dutch steam trawler Olfa (IJM 20) sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 November 1936

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler Olfa (IJM 20) of 155 gross tons and built in 1895 was sold by the N.V. Exploitatie Maatschappij Zuider Haaks, Ijmuiden, Netherlands to the Frank Rijsdijks; Industrieele Ondernemingen, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch steam trawler Inie (IJM 5) sold to broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 November 1936

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler Inie (IJM 5) of 145 gross tons and built in 1891 was sold by the N.V. Exploitatie Maatschappij Zuider Haaks, Ijmuiden, Netherlands to the Frank Rijsdijks; Industrieele Ondernemingen, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

British tug (ex-Graham Menzies) Redesdale sold within the United Kingdom according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 November 1936

An item reported that the British tug (ex-Graham Menzies) Redesdale of 71 gross tons and built at Geertruidenberg, Netherlands in 1912 was sold by Richard Abel and Sons Ltd., Liverpool, England to Messrs. Kay and Dennitt, Rock Ferry, England. 

Dutch tug-trawler Zeemeeuw (ZK 32) sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 13 November 1936

An item reported that the Dutch tug-trawler Zeemeeuw (ZK 32) of 100 gross tons and built in 1892 was sold by the N.V. Visscherij Maatschappij Praxis, IJmuiden, Netherlands to the Frank Rijsdijks; Industrieele Ondernemingen, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch tug-trawler Noordzee (ZK 35) sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 13 November 1936

An item reported that the Dutch tug-trawler Noordzee (ZK 35) of 71 gross tons and built in 1909 was sold by the N.V. Visscherij Maatschappij Praxis, IJmuiden, Netherlands to the Frank Rijsdijks; Industrieele Ondernemingen, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Sunday, 14 January 2018

Russian general cargo ship (ex-Alexandergracht 1991-2012) Georgy Sedov 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 14 January 2018

Russia-flagged, homeport Murmansk, IMO 8811950, MMSI 273380850 and call sign UBQO3, part of the fleet of the Leasing Company Vega LLC, Krasnoyarsk, Russia. The former Dutch general cargo ship Alexandergracht, MMSI 244781000, owned and managed by Spliethoff’s Bevrachtingskantoor, Amsterdam, Netherlands, Netherlands-flagged, homeport Amsterdam and built by Tille Scheepsbouw, Kootstertille, Netherlands in 1991. 

Dutch steam trawler (ex-Ecliptica) Juliana (IJM 63) sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 18 September 1936

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler (ex-Ecliptica) Juliana (IJM 63) in the past also used as cargo ship was sold towards Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

US Government subsiding building merchant ships according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 18 September 1936

An item reported that on behalf of the US Merchant fleet in 6 years 35 cargo and passenger ships were to be built which in time of war could be used as auxiliary ships. The US government intended to pay 35-50% of the 500 million US dollars building costs. 

Dutch sailing lugger VL. 181 sold towards Denmark according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 4 September 1936

An item reported that the Dutch sailing lugger VL. 181 already for some years out of service was sold by N.V. Van Toor’s Bisscherij Maatschappij, Vlaardingen, Netherlands to C.G. Schumann, Egernsund, Denmark. 

Chilean steamship (ex-B.W. III) Castilla sold to new Chilean owner according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 4 September 1936

An item reported that the Chilean steamship (ex-B.W. III) Castilla, built by the shipyard Noordster, Groningen, Netherlands in 1920 was by the shipping company Gildemeister&Co., Valparaiso, Chile was sold to the shipping company Martinez, Pereira&Compañia Limited, San Antonio, Chile. 

Dutch steam trawler IJM 175 sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 4 September 1936

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler IJM 175 of the Exploitatie en Administratie Maatschappij Shamrock, Ijmuiden, Netherlands already laid up for a long time was sold to a Dutch scrap yard to be broken up. 

Dutch steam trawler IJM 151 sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 4 September 1936

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler IJM 151 of the Visscherij Maatschappij Forward, Ijmuiden, Netherlands already laid up for a long time was sold to a Dutch scrap yard to be broken up. 

Dutch steam trawler IJM 9 sold to broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 4 September 1936

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler IJM 9 of the Algemeen Visschers Maatschappij, Ijmuiden, Netherlands already laid up for a long time was sold to a Dutch scrap yard to be broken up. 

Dutch utility vessel Yvonne W 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 14 January 2018

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9631498, MMSI 246690000 and call sign PCMG. Built by the Neptune Shipyard, Hardinxveld-Giessendam, Netherlands in 2011. 

British passenger ship ss Bloemfontein Castle 1949-1959 (Patris 1959-1979, Mediterranean Island 1979-1981, Mediterranean Star 1981-1988, Terra 1988-1989)

With our thanks for allowing us to publish

Owned by the Union Castle Line between 1950-1959, Chandis Lines between 1959-1979 and the Karageorgis Lines between 1979-1987. Launched by Harland&Wollf, Belfast, Northern Ireland with yard number 1421 on 25 August 1949, completed on 6 April 1950, first voyage begun on 6 April 1950, renamed Patris and owned by Chandris Lines, Greece in 1959, Mediterranean Island in 1979, Mediterranean Star in 1981, Terra in 1988, in her last stage of her career used as a ferry and broken up in Pakistan in in 1989. 

Russian bucket dredger Petschora launched at Kinderdijk, Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 31 March 1939

An item reported the launching by the J.&k. Smit’s Scheepswerven N.V., Kinderdijk, Netherlands on Saturday 18th March of the self propelling bucket dredger Petschora built for Russian account. Main dimensions 77 x 13,50 x 5,70 (hold) x 3,70 metres. Machinery consisted of 1-600hp vertical triple expansion steam engine and 2-900hp vertical expansion steam engines. Dredging depth 18 metres. Bucket capacity 1.100 litres. Dredging capacity 750 cubic metres/hour. 

Dutch built Russian dredger Tichbinka exeuted her trials according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 31 March 1939

An item reported that the Tichbinka, third and last dredger built by the Dutsch shipyard De Klop, Sliedrecht, Netherlands executed her trial on 9 March on the Nieuwe Waterweg. Dredging qualities were also tested. Bucket capacity 1.100 litres and dredging capacity 750 cubic metres/hour. 

Dutch built Tunisian ocean going motor tug Cap Carthage executed successfully her trials according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 31 March 1939

An item reported that the Tunisian steel built ocean going motor tug Cap Carthage executed with success her trial on the Nieuwe Maas maintaining a speed of more as 10 knots. She was built by the N.V. T. van Duivendijk’s Scheepswerf, Lekkerkerk, Netherlands for account of the Tunisian government. Dimensions 76.5 x 18.5 x 8.0 feet. Lloyds 110 A 1(towing services). Fitted out with 1-500hp Deutz diesel engine. 

Belgian shipyard ordered to built a tug for Palestina according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 17 March 1939

An item reported that the N.V. Scheepsbouwwerven Jos. Boel&Zonen, Temsche, Belgium was ordered by a firm from Palestina to built a tug with as main dimensions 50 (between perpendiculars) x 12 (outside midsection) x 6.6 (depth at sides) feet and to be used on the Dead Sea. The Dutch Bolman Motorenfabriek, Bolnes, Netherlands was to manufacture 1-200hp 4-cylinder Bolnes diesel 4-HS-230 with none compression. 

Dutch built French steam tug Espadon delivered to owners according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 17 March 1939

An item reported that after a successful trial the French steam tug Espadon was delivered by the N.V. Vlaardingsche Machinefabriek I.A. Kreber, Vlaardingen, Netherlands to her owners. She was especially built to serve in tropical conditions and was fitted out with a 100 ihp engine able to use wood as fuel. 

Greek cabinet ordered by British shipyard Vosper Limited 2 motor torpedo boats according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 17 March 1939

An item reported that the Greek cabinet ordered by Vosper Limited, Portsmouth, England the building of 2 torpedo motorboats with a length of 70 feet of the latest type. The armament was to consist of 21” torpedo tubes and a quick firing gun. The machinery consisted of 4x1.050hp engines allowing a speed of more as 40 knots still excellent seaworthy. With two engines standby were lower speeds possible. Five boats were built for the British Royal Navy and the Swedish ordered the building of similar boats. 

Dutch torpedoes Mk 20, 37 mod 2 and 9

Marinemuseum Den Helder, Netherlands 11-1-2018

Hr.Ms. Friesland destroyers/submarine chaser

Dutch 3-cylinder submarine Hr.Ms. Tonijn

The Mk20 was a British battery powered torpedo fitted out with a passive acoustic target search system and between 1961-1972 used for the Dutch submarines and experimental on board of the Dutch Friesland-class of  destroyers/submarine chasers.
The Mk 37 mod 2 was a wire guided torpedo powered by an Otto fuelled combustion engine and between 1960-1995 used for the Dutch Dolfijn, Potvis and Zwaardvls submarine classes.
The Mk9 was an unguided burner cycle combustion engine powered topedoe and used between 1942-1961 on board of Dutch destroyers. 

Dutch merchant ships were to be fitted out with paravanes according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 29 September 1939

An item reported that according to tidings in the next weeks as much as possible all Dutch merchant ships were to be fitted out with paravanes as protection against naval mines. The passenger ships were the first to be fitted out. 

Dutch steam trawler Hercules sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 29 September 1939

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler Hercules of the N.V. VisscherijOnderneming De Vem, Ijmuiden, Netherlands was decommissioned and sold to a Dutch shipyard to be broken up. 

Dutch steam trawler Zwaluw (IJM 90) sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 24 November 1939

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler Zwaluw (IJM 90) already for some time laid up was sold by the N.V. Zeevissscherij Maatschappij Alaska II, Ijmuiden, Netherlands to a scrap yard at Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch tug Visschershaven sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 24 November 1939

An item reported that the Dutch tug Visschershaven with as homeport Ijmuiden, Netherlands was sold to a scrap yard at Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch ocean going tug Beverwijk 20 sold towards Russia according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 24 November 1939

An item reported that the Dutch ocean going tug Beverwijk 20 of 330 tons gross tonnage, fitted out with 1-900hp steam engine and built by N.V. Werf Vooruit, Enkhuizen, Netherlands in 1921 was sold by the firm J.M. van Hattum’s Havenwerken, Beverwijk, Netherlands towards Russia. She was to be delivered on short notice together with two other smaller tugs bought by Russia in the Netherlands to be delivered at Murmansk, Russia still Netherlands-flagged. 

Russia bought floating sheerleg still under construction at Schiedam, Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 24 November 1939

An item reported that Russia bought a 150 tons floating sheerleg still under construction at the shipyard Gusto, Schiedam, Netherlands to be delivered within some months.(1)

Note
1. Probably never delivered. 

Saturday, 13 January 2018

20th-21st Century wire-guided submarine craft

Marinemuseum Den Helder, Netherlands 11-1-2018

Zr.Ms. Zierikzee of the Alkmaar-class, Den Helder, 11 July 2008

The Poisson Auto Propulse or PAP was used by the Dutch Alkmaar-class mine hunters for detecting and destroying sea mines. 

Polish motor herring lugger Delphin II (Gdy 113) sold towards France according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 24 November 1939

An item reported that the Polish motor herring lugger Delphin II (Gdy 113) of the Polish Visscherij Maatschappij Delphin lying in the Koningin Wilhelmina, Vlaardingen, Netherlands sold to France was fitted out for departure towards her new destination. A French master and steersmen already arrived at Vlaardingen with the intention to go from Vlaardingen-Dordrecht-Vlissingen, all 3 Dutch cities towards France. 

Polish motor herring lugger Delphin I (Gdy 112) sold towards France according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 24 November 1939

An item reported that the Polish motor herring lugger Delphin I (Gdy 112) of the Polish Visscherij Maatschappij Delphin lying in the Koningin Wilhelmina, Vlaardingen, Netherlands sold to France was fitted out for departure towards her new destination. A French master and steersmen already arrived at Vlaardingen with the intention to go from Vlaardingen-Dordrecht-Vlissingen, all 3 Dutch cities towards France. 

Dutch sailing lugger Johanna Maria (KW 131) sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 8 December 1939

An item reported that the Dutch sailing lugger Johanna Maria (KW 131) of the shipping company N. Parlevliet Lz., Katwijk aan Zee, Netherlands all since year ago decommissioned and laid up in the Haringhaven, Ijmuiden, Netherlands were sold to a Dutch shipyard to be broken up. Belonged to the last of the two sailing luggers in the Dutch fishery. 

Dutch sailing lugger Friendship (KW 137) sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 8 December 1939

An item reported that the Dutch sailing lugger Friendship (KW 137) of the shipping company N. Parlevliet Lz., Katwijk aan Zee, Netherlands all since year ago decommissioned and laid up in the Haringhaven, Ijmuiden, Netherlands were sold to a Dutch shipyard to be broken up. Belonged to the last of the two sailing luggers in the Dutch fishery. 

Dutch steam trawler Emma (IJM 177) sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 22 December 1939

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler Emma (IJM 177) built by J. Duthie Sons&Co., Aberdeen, Scotland in 1899 was sold by the N.V. Scheeps Expolitatie Maatschappij De Marezaten, Ijmuiden, Netherlands to a Dutch shipyard to be broken up. 

Italian sailing cargo ship (ex-Meta 1911-1957, Onice 1957-2016) Brigantes 2016-


As the Meta

Introduction
She is the first freighter currently in the Mediterranean Sea, used for sail cargo to transport organic and fair-trade goods, and currently undergoing restoration. A first phase of the refit works is being completed in the craft shipyard Da.Ro.Mar.Ci D'Amico of Trapani; it will be followed by the reconstruction of the interiors and the superstructures - most of them in wood -, the redesign and reconstruction of the sail system on the basis of original drawings, and the restoration of the electrical system with the integration of renewable energy sources (photovoltaic, aerodynamic turbines), so as to make the ship operational with zero emissions. By the end of 2018 will the restoration to be completed. The intention is to transport goods between North and Souh America and the Mediterranean Sea, such as organic coffee, cocoa, Azorean tea, and other products based on the broken routes concept and developments in commercial network of “sailing.” The brig, of 30 meters in length, has in fact a very large hold, and can load up to 220 tons of goods. The availability of professional training places for seamen (specialization on large sailing ships) and passenger accommodation, as well as the possibility of using the ship during maritime events complete the offer of the activities by her.

As a sailing cargo ship
We do not always think about the fact that most of our everyday goods, to be available on the market at competitive prices, are transported for long distances by sea on huge container ships fed by huge quantities of fossil fuels, contributing significantly to the emissions of carbon dioxide and polluting substances in the atmosphere and in the seas themselves. The transport company Brigantes Shipping Ltd., is founded by the brothers Oscar Kravina, master of the ax, Daniel Kravina, entrepreneur, the German naval engineer Tobias Blome and the Sicilian sailor Giuseppe Ferreri, and intends to propose a sustainable freight transport alternative thanks to the use of wind energy and self-produced renewable energy on board. Brigantes Shipping Ltd. is aimed at those operators active in the production of organic food and fair trade, which until now lacked the ability to transport their goods in a manner consistent with the company philosophy.


The commercial network of "sailing" is perfectly integrated with sustainable freight transport projects such as those related to rail mobility, electric mobility, projects for the recovery of animal traction by road or recovery of internal waterways. The possibility of interacting with digital platforms that optimize the efficiency of joint purchasing groups is interesting. It will be the task of Brigantes, together with the other members of the “Sail Cargo Alliance”, an alliance of free ship owners and managers of sailing ships, with the aim of “creating a healthy culture of transport that promotes the conservation of the environment for future generations ”, fill this gap.

The Brigantes and her role in maritime heritage, education and events
It will be possible to combine sailing transport with educational programs including academic (master, business school programs, teambuilding etc.) for groups of students and teachers on board, including the possibility of being actively included in the overall experience of ecological transport, from the producer to the distribution network, up to the final consumer. Countless are the ideal routes to create a fair trade cruise with transport of goods included, combining freight transport with sustainable tourism, and the organization of events on board, such as concerts, artistic events, theatrical performances, cooking classes.

History 
Launched at the C.H.Luhring shipyard, Elsfleth, Germany in 1911 as the gullet schooner Meta and used as a cargo ship between Germany and Denmark. At the beginning of the 1920s she was registered in the French merchant marine register and after sailing for a few years in the north of France, circumnavigated the Iberian peninsula and entered the Mediterranean to reach Tuscany where it was registered with the registration number 481 in the maritime compartment of Livorno, starting to sail transporting talc from Sardinia. In 1924 it was bought by Carlo Pezzica, a marble merchant in Carrara, on behalf of the shipowner Giovanni Marchetti of Carrara. In 1927 a two-cylinder internal combustion propulsion engine was added, but continued to hold the schooner rig with gabbells. In 1937 the new captain and ship owner Ferdinando Gianfranchi (called ‘il liscio”) sold it to captain Giovanni Fanciulli of the island of Giglio.



Until the 1950s between Sardinia and Tuscany active was she in 1957 by the Benetti shipyards of Viareggio converted into a motor ship. The reconstruction included dismantling of the sailing rig, adding a new and more powerful propulsion engine (Ansaldo, a supercharged 4-cylinder 180hp) and of the aft superstructures with four cabins and the control bridge. The only hatchway mast was positioned slightly aft, and a second one was added forward of it. A derrick between the two coats, with the relative branches of prow and stern, was installed to allow the loading of the load. At the stern were added superstructures: three single cabins to starboard and a small kitchen, the mess hall and the cabin usually used by the onboard cook, on the left. Above this structure, the bridge made by a small cabin that housed the wheel of the rudder and aft of it, a small independent divided space that housed the chart and the guard bed. The rudder was modified by inserting the classic “chain ice” system.
The Onice

Renamed Onice was she sold to the island of Pantelleria (compartment Trapani) as part of the Pantelleria motovelieri that guaranteed the transport of goods of the small island of Sicily. Until 1998 active in this area, initially guaranteeing the transport of raisins, capers and various goods for Naples, Livorno, Tunisia, Malta and later in 1986 ensuring the supply of kitchen gas cylinders to the domestic needs of the island.

In 1998 forced the advanced age of the ship owner and the master and motorist nearing retirement to take the decision to end her activities as a cargo ship., the painful decision of disarmament was taken. In May 1998 the last trip from Pantelleria to Trapani was carried out with only fifty tons of ballast (marble dust) and in the morning of May 28th moored in the Roncilio pier. Laid up until 2016 she got a new chance starting with a restoration. The well known Eye of the Wind was as the Friedrich also built in 1911 sharing with the Meta the same dimensions.

Funding through Crowdinvesting
The restoration of the Brigantes is financed through donations of materials, voluntary work, but mainly through the crowd funding, that is the possibility of buying company shares, also becoming co-owners of the ship. Of the 800 shares put up for sale at a price of € 1,000 each, out of a total of 1600, more than 200 have already been sold, going to finance more than 25% of her restoration work in parallel: it was executed and paid for 80% of the work on the steel hull, at the craft yard Da.Ro.Mar.Ci D'Amico of Trapani. The last works of metallic carpentry and conservative painting are about to be completed. This financing model is inspired by the historic “carat model”, which has a long tradition in the naval transport sector: long before the participatory investment (crowdinvesting) became popular. Thanks to the cutting-edge technology, it was usual to divide the costs that buying or building a ship implied within a larger or smaller group of people, thus making the investment accessible to many, and thus distributing the dividends and co-ownership of the vessel itself.

The Brigantes in addition to goods and products consistent with the company philosophy, will therefore bring in our seas a message of change possible and within reach of anyone who really wants to be part of it.

 For more information about this ship watch her own website on WEBSITE BRIGANTES

South Korean container ship (ex-Hanjin Seattle 2011-2017, SM Norfolk 2017-2017) MSC Savannah 2017-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 January 2017

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9461477, MMSI 636018058 and call sign D5NZ3. Built by Hyundai Samho HeavyIndustries, Samsho, South Korea in 2011. Owned by Korea Tonnage No. 28 Shipping Company, chartered by MSC-Mediterranean Shipping Company, managed by SM Line Corporation, Seoul, South Korea and technical managed by KLCSM Company Limited. As the Hanjin Seattle Panama-flagged, MMSI 356941000, owned by Gearbulk Norway, Bergen, Norway and managed by Hanjin Shipping, Seoul, South Korea. 

French steam trawler Jacqueline Louise sold to the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 25 June 1937

An item reported that the French steam trawler Jacqueline Louise of 148 tons gross tonnage and built in 1889 at Hull, England was sold by Morau&Cayrousse, Dieppe, France to the N.V. Frank Rijsdijk’s Industrieele Ondernemingen, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch steam trawler Adriatic renamed Jan Mainland (IJM 18) according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 25 June 1937

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler Adriatic of 217 tons gross tonnage was sold by the N.V. Exploitatie Maatschappij Zeemeeuw at Ijmuiden, Netherlands to the N.V. Stoomvisscherij Maatschappij Mercurius, Ijmuiden. She had been laid up for some while and was now fitted out for the fishery again. In August was reported that she was renamed Jan Mayenland keeping her pennant IJM 18. 

British trawler Eastburne sold to the Netherland to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 28 May 1937

An item reported that the British trawler Eastburne of 163 gross tonnage and built at Glasgow, Scotland in 1896 was sold by the Plymouth Trawlers Limited, Plymouth, England to the N.V. Frank Rijsdijk’s Industrieele Ondernemingen, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. Was to be brought to the Netherlands. 

British trawler Elector (Lowestoft 579) sold to the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 14 May 1937

An item reported that the British trawler Elector (Lowestoft 579) of 169 tons gross tonnage and built in 1898 was sold by A. Goudlby, Lowestoft, England to the shipyard Holland at Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

British fishing vessel Victor sold to the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 14 May 1937

An item reported that the British fishing vessel Victor of 193 tons gross tonnage and built at Beverley, England in 1897 was sold by A.C. Mitchell, Lowestoft, England to the shipyard De Koophandel, Nieuwe-Lekkerland, Netherlands to be broken up. 

French Normandie-class battleships fitted out with mines according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 5

Normandie-class

An item reported that the French Normandie-class would be fitted out with 30 mines.(1)

Note
1. The Normandie-class 25.230 tons battleships consisted of the Normandie, Flandre, Gascoigne, Langedoc and Béarn except for the latter ship not completed. The Béarn was completed as an aircraft carrier. 

Former French monitor le Tonnerre used as target according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 5

An item reported that the French target le Tonnerre was again towed to a shoal and to be beached to be used as target for gun exercises by the 2nd cruiser squadron.(1)

Note
1. Breastwork monitor with as sister ship Fulminant, laid down by Arsenal de Lorient, France in October 1873, launched in September 1875, completed in 1879, used as torpedo depot ship in 1890s and stricken in 1905. 

Greek passenger annex cargo ship cruise ship (ex-Windsor Castle 1960-1977) Margarita L 1088-2004) Rita 2004-2005


With our thanks for allowing us to publish

IMO 5391923. Ex-Windsor Castle of the Union Castle Line renamed 1977 and Margarita L renamed Rita on 14 December 2004. Than St. Vincent&Grenadines-flagged. Broken up on beach at Alang, India in 2005. Owners in 1984 Santa Marianna Shipping&Trading Corporation, Panama. Arrived on 9 October 1977 at Piraeus, Greece to be converted in to a floating luxe hotel and berthed at Jeddah, Saudi Arabia and since 4 June 1991 in the Eleusis Bay, Greece. Built by Cammell Laird Shiprepairers&Shipbuilding, Birkenhead, United Kingdom in 1995-1960. 

Dutch trawler Zeemeeuw sold towards the Free City of Danzig according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 5 January 1940

An item reported that the Dutch trawler Zeemeeuw of 105 tons gross tonnage and built by the Scheepswerf ‘s Lands Welvaren v/h I.S. Figee, Vlaardingen, Netherlands in 1917 was sold by Reederij Gebr. Parleviet Dzn., Katwijk aan Zee, Netherlands to the Hochsee G.m.b.H. Kormaron at Danzig and renamed Matzkau. (1)

Note
1. The Danziger Hochseefischerei-Gesellschaft Kormoran m.b.H. founded on 10 June 1939, Free City of Danzig. Preceded by the Visscherij Maatschappij Neptune also named N.V. Zeevaart Maatschappijvoor Overzeevisscherij Neptun or Hochseefischerei und Fischindustrie m.b.H., Gdynia, Poland. 

Dutch tug Sabi executed her trials with success according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 15 March 1940

An item reported a successful trial on 3 March on the IJ executed by the Dutch tug Sabi built by Scheepswerf en Machinefabriek Concordia firm S. Seymonsbergen, Amsterdam, Netherlands for account of the Vereenigde Nederlandsche Scheepvaart Maatschappij, The Hague, Netherlands. Dimensions 21,30 (between perpendiculars)-24 (over all) x 5,25 (on thrushes) x 1,80 metres. Fitted out with 1-300hp Werkspoo engine. 

Dutch steam trawler Ita (IJM 22) sold to new Dutch owner according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 26 April 1940

An item reported that the Dutch N.V. Visscherij Maatschappij De Daad, Ijmuiden, Netherlands bought the Dutch steam trawler Ita (IJM 22) from the Dutch B.V. Exploitatie Maatschappij Zuiderhaaks. She had been laid up for some time. 

Dutch steam trawler Corrie (IJM 21) sold to new Dutch owner according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 26 April 1940

An item reported that the Dutch N.V. Visscherij Maatschappij De Daad, Ijmuiden, Netherlands bought the Dutch steam trawler Corrie (IJM 21) from the Dutch B.V. Exploitatie Maatschappij Zuiderhaaks. She had been laid up for some time. 

Dutch steam trawler Holland IV (IJM 180) sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 12 April 1940

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler Holland IV (IJM 180) built in 1899 was sold by the Visscherij Maatschappij Holland, Ijmuiden, Netherlands to a Dutch shipyard to be broken up. 

Friday, 12 January 2018

Greek tug (ex-Negro Prince 1975-1976, Petrola's Seamaster 1976-1987) Hellas 1987-



Inner harbour, Vlissingen, Netherlands 24 April 2012

Saint Vincent&Grenadines-flagged, homeport Kingstown, IMO 7419690, MMSI 375113000 and call sign J8B3126. Ex-Nego Prince renamed 1976 and ex-Petrola’s Seamaster 20 (renamed 1987). Gross tonnage 493,39 (national)-606 (international) tons, summer deadweight 563 tons and as dimensions 50,50 (over all) x 10 x 4,40 x 4,80 (depth) metres. Horsepower 5.200 bhp. Bollard pull 75 tons. Speed maximum 14 knots. Design Matsuura Tekko Zosen. Built in 1975 by Matsura Iron Shipbuilding, Osakikamijima, Japan. Owned by Interport Marine Incorporation and managed by Pella Shipping/Salvage&Towage Gigilinis Shipping Group, Thessaloniki, Greece. Also Hellas AG Shipping is mentioned as owner. Anno 31 December 2017 Belize-flagged, MMSI 312247000 and call sign V3TC7. 

French steam trawler Fregate II sold to the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 14 May 1937

An item reported that the French steam trawler Fregate II of 239 tons gross tonnage and built in 1914 was sold by the Compagnie Lorientaise de Chalutage, Lorient, France to the shipyard De Koophandel, Nieuwe-Lekkerland, Netherlands to be broken up. 

British trawler Sea Hawk sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 28 May 1937

An item reported that the British trawler Sea Hawk of 169 gross tonnage and built at Aberdeen, Scotland in 1898 was sold by the Plymouth Trawlers Limited, Plymouth, England to the N.V. Frank Rijsdijk’s Industrieele Ondernemingen, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. Was to be brought to the Netherlands. 

British trawler Hawthorn sold to the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 28 May 1937

An item reported that the British trawler Hawthorn of 398 gross tonnage and built at Greenock, Scotland in 1903 was sold by W.J. Ireland, Hull, England to the shipyard De Koophandel, Nieuwe-Lekkerland, Netherlands to be broken up. 

British trawler Auckland (Lowestoft 445) sold to the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 14 May 1937

An item reported that the British trawler Auckland (Lowestoft 445) of 155 gross tonnage and built in 1899 was sold by A. Goudlby, Lowestoft, England to the shipyard Holland at Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

British steamship Pisaldar sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 14 May 1937

An item reported that the British steamship Pisaldar of 4.919 gross tonnage was sold by the Springwell Shipping Company Limited, London, England to a British firm to be broken up. 

Dutch sailing lugger Johannes Jacoba sold towards Denmark according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 10 July 1936

An item reported that the Dutch steel built sailing lugger Johannes Jacoba of the N.V. Van Toor’s Visscherij Mij, Vlaardingen was sold towards Denmark. The last 7 years was she no more active in the fishery. The new owner seems to intend her after arrival in a Danish harbour to fit out with a motor and convert her into a cargo vessel. 

Japanese bulk carrier Ocean Rainbow 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 January 2017

Panama-flaged, IMO 9598024, MMSI 370867000 and call sign HPKG. Owned and managed by Doun Kisen, Imabari, Japan. Built by Minaminippon Shipbuilding, Usuki, Japan in 2011. 

Tug Thorn built for West-Africa according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 19 January 1940

An item reported that the shipyard N.V. Scheepsbouw- en Reparatiewerf De Hoop v/h Gebr. Boot, Leiden, Netherlands delivered the new funnel tug Thorn for West-Africa. Dimensions 18,29 x 3,90 x 1,50 metres. Fitted out with 1-3 cylinder 110/121hp Deutz diesel. The edition dated 2 February 1940 reported that she executed her trials and was to be transported with a Dutch ship towards her destination to be used on the rivers there

Dutch salvage vessel Dolfijn sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 19 January 1940

An item reported that the Dutch salvage vessel Dolfijn built in 1892 and stationed at Ijmuiden, Netherlands was sold by the Dutch shipping company N.V.Wijsmuller at IJmuiden to a Dutch shipyard to be broken up. 

Former Dutch dredger H.A.M. 2 now South African property according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 19 January 1940

An item reported that the Dutch dredger H.A.M. 2 of 806 tons gross and 477 tons net tonnage and built by L. Smit&Zoon, Kinderdijk, Netherlands in 1912 was now owned by the Hollandse Aannemings Maatschappij Suid Afrika (Eiendoms), Cape Town, South Africa and England-flagged. 

Thursday, 11 January 2018

Dutch trawler Nelly Gezina (IJM 43)sold to be broken up in the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 May 1938

An item reported that the Dutch trawler Nelly Gezina (IJM 43) of 173 tons gross tonnage was sold by the N.V. Vereenigde Exploitatie Maatschappij (VEM), Ijmuiden, Netherlands to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch trawler Derika 8 (IJM 374) sold to be broken up in the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 May 1938

An item reported that the Dutch trawler Derika 8 (IJM 374) of 210 tons gross tonnage was sold by the N.V. Vereenigde Exploitatie Maatschappij (VEM), Ijmuiden, Netherlands to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch trawler Derika 12 (IJM 125) sold to be broken up in the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 May 1938

An item reported that the Dutch trawler Derika 12 (IJM 125) of 156 tons gross tonnage was sold by the N.V. Vereenigde Exploitatie Maatschappij (VEM), Ijmuiden, Netherlands to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch trawler Derika 14 (IJM 271) sold to be broken up in the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 May 1938

An item reported that the Dutch trawler Derika 14 (IJM 271) of 223 tons gross tonnage was sold by the N.V. Vereenigde Exploitatie Maatschappij (VEM), Ijmuiden, Netherlands to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch motor trawl cutter K.W. 21 was to be lengthened at Scheveningen, Neherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 4 February 1938

An item reported that the Dutch motor trawl cutter K.W. 21 owned by the shipping company Jac. Guyt, Katwijk, Netherlands arrived on 20 January. She was by the Scheveningsche Sleephelling Maatschappij to be lengthened with 3,5-4 metres. 

Dutch government steamship Lucifer cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 16 August 1889

An item Batavia, Dutch East Indies dated 15th reported the arrival of the Dutch government steamship Lucifer master Hakker coming from the Noordwachter Eiland, Dutch East Indies. 

Greece strengthening her navy according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 4

Salamis

An item reported that except for the fast 19.500 ton cruiser Salamis (1) ordered at the German shipyard Vulkan and the submarine Xiphias (2) ordered by the French company Creusot the Greek government purchased a third warship. It was the 2.800 ton cruiser Tchao-Ho (3) being built by Armstrong for account of the Chinese government. Dimensions 1005, x 12,8 x 4 metres. Armament consisted of 2-15cm L/50 guns, 4-10cm L/50 guns, 2-7,6cm guns, 6-4,7cm guns, 2-3,7cm guns and 45cm torpedo launchers. The armour consisted of no more as a 1,8cm thick armour deck. The machinery consisted of 6.500hp Parsons turbines allowing a speed of 20 miles.

Notes
1. Sometimes also called Vasilefs Georgias, building ordered in 1912, laid down by AG Vulkan, Hamburg, Germany on 23 July 1913, launched on 11 November 1914, never completed and broken up in 1932.
2. Building ordered by Schneider Shipyards, Toulon, France in 1913, launched in 1913, commissioned in March 1913 and decommissioned in 1920.
3. This must be the Chao-Ho, laid down by Armstrong Whitworth, England on 7 October 1910, launched on 23 October 1911, completed on 21 February 1912, handed over to China in 1913 and finally sunk when Japanese aircraft bombarded Guangzhou on 30 September 1937. 

Japanese battle cruiser Kongo superior compared with British battle cruiser HMS Queen Mary according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 4

Japanese Kongo-class

An item referred that the British battle cruiser HMS Queen Mary (1) was compared with the just two months later launched Japanese battle cruiser Kongo.(2) On the latter ship was the aft funnel and mast such positioned that the third turret could fire straight aft. The weight distribution seemed to be better handled on board of the Kongo if the figures were correct.

The Queen Mary had an armament of 4x2-34,3cm/13.5” L/45 guns, 16x1-10,1cm/4” L/50 guns and 2 submerged 53cm torpedo tubes against the 4x2-35,6cm/14” L/45 guns, 16x1-15,2cm/6” L/50 guns and 8 submerged 53cm torpedo tubes of the Kongo. Was the Queen Mary armoured on the waterline 10,1-22,8cm, turrets 22,8-254cm and 5cm gun shields, the figures for the Kongo were far more impressive with respectively 15,2-25cm, 25,4cm and 12,7-15,2cm (for the casemate.

Notes
1. Ordered under the 1910-1911 Naval Programme. Laid down by Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company, Jarrow, England on 6 March 1911, launched on 20 March 1912, completed in August 1913, commissioned on 4 September 1913 and sunk at the Battle of Jutland on 31 May 1916 during a fight with the German SMS Derfflinger and Seydlitz.
2. Of the Kongo-class consisting of the Kongo, Haruna, Hiei and Kirishima. Laid down at Vickers, Barrow-in-Furness, United Kingdom on 17 January 1911, launched on 18 May 1912, completed on 16 August 1913, In 1924, 1927-1928 modernized and reconstructed September 1929-31 March 1931 reconstructed into a battleship, after modernizing 1 June 1935-8 January 1937 was she a classified as a fast battleship  and torpedoed and sunk by the American submarine USS Sealion around 55 nautical miles north west of Keelung after entering Formosa Strait 1 day earlier on 21 November 1944. Designed by the British naval engineer George Thurston

US military aircraft needed to be protected against musketry according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1913-1914 no. 4

An item reported that the US Department of War ordered that all aircraft used for war purposes needed to be fitted out with 2mm thick chrome steel plates protecting against musketry. All plates were to be tested before fitting. 

British Acorn class destroyers suffering problems at maximum speed and high seas according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 6

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau reporting that seven British Acorn-class destroyers returned at Portland with heavy damages caused by trials executed in high seas and speeds up to 28 miles. The heavy impact force resulted in losing rivets allowing water to enter the fuel oil bunkers polluting the oil which became useless. Some hull plates were even heavily dented. The navy wondered what caused this problems considering the fact that the destroyers were very strongly built and for this reason was the maximum contract speed limited to just 27 miles.(1)

Note
1. The Acorn-class consisted of 21 destroyers preceded by the Beagle-class and succeeded by the Acheron-class. 

British destroyer HMS Coquette probably too weak built according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 6

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau reporting that the British destroyer HMS Coquette was shaking that much that at a speed of 21 miles her crew had to go below deck. She seemed to be built to weakly.(1)

Note
1. Building ordered under the 1896-1897 Naval Estimates, laid down by John I. Thornycroft, Chiswick, England with yard number 319 on 8 June 1896, launched on 25 November 1897, commissioned in January 1899 and lost after striking a mine of the German submarine UC-10 in the North Sea on 7 March 1916. 

Norwegian LPG tanker (ex-Brigittegas 2001) Saargas 2001-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 January 2017

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 9135781, MMSI 636016594 and call sign A8LO7. Managed by Hartmann Reederei, Leer, Germany and owned by Hartgas LPG, Oslo, Norway/ Ex-Brigittegas renamed 19 January 2001. Built by Santierul Naval Severnav, Severin, Romania in 2011. 

Dutch trawler Kamperduin (IJM 150) sold to be broken up in the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 May 1938

An item reported that the Dutch trawler Kamperduin (IJM 150) of 181 tons gross tonnage was sold by the N.V. Vereenigde Exploitatie Maatschappij (VEM), Ijmuiden, Netherlands to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Id0-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch trawler Timor (IJM 491) sold to be broken up in the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 May 1938

An item reported that the Dutch trawler Timor (IJM 491) of 208 tons gross tonnage was sold by the N.V. Vereenigde Exploitatie Maatschappij (VEM), Ijmuiden, Netherlands to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch trawler Schiedijk (IJM 482) sold to be broken up in the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 May 1938

An item reported that the Dutch trawler Schiedijk (IJM 482) of 229 tons gross tonnage was sold by the N.V. Vereenigde Exploitatie Maatschappij (VEM), Ijmuiden, Netherlands to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up

Dutch trawler Amsteldijk (IJM 481) sold to be broken up in the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 May 1938

An item reported that the Dutch trawler Amsteldijk (IJM 481) of 236 tons gross tonnage was sold by the N.V. Vereenigde Exploitatie Maatschappij (VEM), Ijmuiden, Netherlands to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch trawler Dirk Jacobus (IJM 267) sold to be broken up in the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 May 1938

An item reported that the Dutch trawler Dirk Jacobus (IJM 267) of 173 tons gross tonnage was sold by the N.V. Vereenigde Exploitatie Maatschappij (VEM), Ijmuiden, Netherlands to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Wednesday, 10 January 2018

Dutch steam drifter Holland VII sold to be broken up in the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 May 1938

An item reported that the Dutch steam drifter Holland VII of 139 tons gross tonange and built by the Arnhemsche Stoomsleephelling Maatschappij, Arnhem, Netherlands in 1918 was sold by the N,V. Zeevisscherij Maatschappij Holland, Ijmuiden, Netherlands towards Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. She was laid up at Ijmuiden. 

Dutch steam drifter Holland VI sold to be broken up in the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 May 1938

An item reported that the Dutch steam drifter Holland VI of 137 tons gross tonange and built by the Arnhemsche Stoomsleephelling Maatschappij, Arnhem, Netherlands in 1917 was sold by the N,V. Zeevisscherij Maatschappij Holland, Ijmuiden, Netherlands towards Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. She was laid up at Ijmuiden. 

Dutch steam trawler (ex-Falcon) Olga sold to be broken up in the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 27 May 1938

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler (ex-Falcon) Olga of 155 tons gross tonnage and built at Hull, England in 1895 was sold by the N.V. Exploitatie Maatschappij Zuiderhaaks, Ijmuiden, Netherlands to the N.V. Frank Rijsdijk’s Industrieele Ondernemingen, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands. 

Singapore-owned LPG tanker Lady Hilde 1998-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 7 January 2017

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9172129, MMSI 565039000 and call sign 9VHV4. Gross tonnage 2.998 tons, summer deadweight 3.183 tons and as dimensions 96 x 15 x 5,6 metres. Built in 1998 by Kanrei Shipbuilding, Sanmu, Japan. Owned and managed by BSM Singapore, Singapore. 

Dutch built tug Russian tug Skvall executing trials according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 26 November 1938

An item reported that the Russian tug Skvall built by Verschure&Co,’s Scheepswerf en Machinefabriek, Amsterdam, Netherlands executed her trials on the North Sea on 7-8 November 1938. Fitted out with 1-900 triple expansion steam engine also built by the shipyard. Dimensions 44,20 (between perpendiculars) x 9,80 (outside thrushes) x 4,60 (hold) metres. 

Wilhelmshaven was to become the major naval base of the German navy according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1907-1908 No. 8

An item referred to the newspaper London Standard reporting that Germany intended to promote Wilhelmshaven to the major naval base. The reason for this decision was that the distance between Wilhelmshaven and the North Sea was less than between Kiel and the North Sea. The North Sea was the possible area where the German fleet had probably to act in the future. At Wilhelmshaven were now large docks construction and other important facilities under constructed to be completed at the end of 1908. 

French torpedo boat le Grondeur collided with protected cruiser Jean Bart according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1894-1895 no. 6

An item reported the collision of the new French torpedo boat le Grondeur with the protected cruiser Jean Bart. With a speed of 28 miles she entered the harbour of Toulon with burning woodwork and ablaze boilers. Her crew numbering 20 men keeping calm managed to extinguish the fire and bringing her still afloat in the dock.(1)

Note
1. Part of the Coureur-class ocean going torpedo boats consisting of the Coureur, Véloce and Grondeur, laid down by F.C. de la Méditerrannée, Graville, Le Havre, France in 1890, launched on 4 November 1891, completed in 1892 and sold in 1910. 

American torpedo boat USS Ericsson harassed by problems with the screws according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1894-1895 no. 6

An item referred to the Army and Navy Journal reporting that the American torpedo boat USS Ericsson underway towards New Orleans, USA lost a blade of her left screw and 2/3 of the blades of her right screw. The blades were cast iron made.(1)

Note
1. The TB2 laid down by Iowa Iron Works, Dubuque, USA in July 1892, launched on 12 May 1894, completed in February 1897 and sunk as a target on 5 April 1912. 

The building of gunboats and mortar boats for the British Royal Navy as described by Dutch navy officers in 1856

An item reported that the Dutch navy lieutenants 1st class Jhr. A. Klerck and 2nd class J. Phaff were sent with the Dutch schooner Zr. Ms. Atalante to attend the British naval review of Spithead, Engeland in 1856. At that moment was the so-called Crimean War (16 October 1853-30 March 1856) in which the United Kingdom was involved ended. However the results and demands of this war became clear during their visit. In a report to the minister of Navy they described what they saw. The Atalante left on 7th April arriving at Portsmouth, England on the 14th where they were spoke the British vice admiral Sir Geroge Seymour, commanding officer there. The worse weather conditions prevented visiting the ships on the roads. As alternative were instead the gunboats in the harbour visited. They pointed out those boats were built to serve over seas in the latest war and not for the coastal defence of the United Kingdom.

In the opinion of the Dutch navy officers was the fact that the British Royal Navy lacked flotilla vessels the main reason for the unemployment of the Baltic fleet in 1854-1855. This was compensated by the building of around 200 gunboats and 200 mortar boats by private shipyards. The gunboats were small steamships with as rough dimensions 35 x 8 metres and a tonnage of 235 British tons. There were 3 types namely with 20,40 and 60hp although of the latter type the largest number, the difference between the type was just a slight different draught and around 20 tons smaller tonnage although with a similar armament. The largest type had a draught of 7 feet, the smaller types just 4-5 feet. All screw propelled without the possibility to lift the screw and with direct drive high pressure steam engines.

Source
Verhandeling en berigten betrekkelijk het Zeewezen, de Zeevaartkunde en de daarme in verband staande wetenschappen, 2nd part. Jacob Swart. 1856. 

Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Friesland visited Palermo, Italy in December 1903


An item reported that the Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Friesland (1) captain A.L. van der Moolen was commissioned on the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands on 1 October 1903. On 1 December left she Nieuwediep towards the Dutch East Indies. She arrived on the 22nd at Palermo, Italy, leaving two days later.

Her commanding officer supplied in his report some details dealing with the harbour. He advices not to enter the harbour with a large ship if men was lacking sufficient knowledge about the local conditions. For large ships were to anchor in the northern part of the harbour available which at the same time provided the best shelter. Space for ships with a large draught was limited. Pilot service was excellent. The Italian navy seems normally to be represented by a torpedo gunboat. During his visit was that the Partenope. During the visit of the Friesland arrived also the German training ship Moltke and the Italian aviso Colonna. The harbour was quite popular by steamships; in the last year for instance 30 Netherlands-flagged. Alone in the coastal shipping were sailing vessels active. There was one shipyard with two slips, one with a length of 260 feet where a steamship was under construction. The yard was related to a boiler plant and an iron and copper foundry. The Dutch commander did not succeed in obtaining more details about the shipyard. He wrote that purchasing victuals of good quality was no problem. Further more was good British coal available although the very slow loading was a problem. In one day was just 235 ton loaded. The drinking water transported via a six year earlier laid pipeline was of good quality.

Note
1. Of the Holland-class first subclass including the Holland, Zeeland and Friesland, based on the design of the British protected cruiser HMS Apollo of 1891. The Dutch design was later used for designing a Chinese variant. Laid down by Nederlandse Stoomboot Maatschappij, Rotterdam, Netherlands on 4 November 1895, launched on 4 November 1896, commissioned on 16 February 1898, decommissioned on 1 February 1911 to undergo important heavy repairs but not executed  and sold to be broken up for ƒ 152.055,- on 28 May 1913.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1903-1904.