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Friday, 23 June 2017

Belgium-flagged drilling vessel (ex-Normand Draupne 1985-2015) Omalius 2015-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 June 2017

Belgium-flagged, IMO 8406470, MMSI 205682000 and call sign ORRS. As the anchor handling vessel Norman Draupne owned and managed by Solstad Rederi, Skudeneshavn, Norway, Norway International Register-flagged, homeport Skudeneshavn, call sign LNZJ and MMSI 25834400. Built by Hatlo Verksted, Ulsteinvik, Norway in 1985. Sold to G-tec in 2015 and converted into the drilling vessel Omalius. 

German LPG tanker Gaschem Arctic 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 June 2017

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 9371672, MMSI 636091782 and call sign A8SV7. Owned by Chemgas Schiffahrt and managed by Hartmann Reederei, both of Leer, Germany. Built by Santierul Naval Severnav, Severin, Romania in 2010. 

Dutch ro-ro cargo ship Bothniaborg 2004-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 June 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Delfzijl, Netherlands, IMO 9267728, MMSI 245656000 and call sign PBIO. Owned and managed by Wagenborg Shipping, Delfzijl, Netherlands. Built by Volharding Shipyard, Hoogezand, Netherlands in 2004. 

Japanese general cargo ship Finch Arrow 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 June 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9574860, MMSI 371129000 and call sign 3EYK5. Owned by Doun Kisen, Imabari, Japan and managed by Seaquest Oriental, Singapore. Built by Mitsui Ichihara Engineering&Shipbuilding, Ichihara, Japan in 2013. 

American bulk carrier Lake Deer 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 June 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9573921, MMSI 372401000 and call sign 3FTG7. Built by Imabari Shipbuilding, Imabari, Japan in 2011. Owned by Fairfield Chemical Carriers, Wilton, Connecticut, USA and managed by Misuga Kaiun, Tokyo, Japan. 

Gibraltar-flagged oil/chemical tanker (ex-Besiktas Scotland 2007-2015) Atlantic Mate 2015-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 15 June 2017

Gibraltar-flagged, IMO 9350745, MMSI 236683000 and call sign ZDPO7. Ex-Besiktas Scotland, owned and managed by the Besiktas Group, Istanbul, Turkey, Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, call sign 9HYB8 and MMSI 256587000. Built by Cicek Shipyard Marine Industry, Istanbul, Turkey in 2007. Renamed in Decmber 2015. 

German tug (ex-Atlantic Spruce 1995-1997, Felix 1997-2017) Carl 2017-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 14 June 2017

Germany-flagged, IMO 9112739, MMSI 211749880 and call sign DKEY. As the Felix owned by Bugsertjeneste II c/o Ostensjo Rederi AS and managed by Ostensjo Rederi AS, both of Haugesund, Norway, Norway-flag, homeport Haugesund, MMI 259415000, call sign LIQK and built by East Isle Shipyard, Georgetown, Canada with yard number 62in 1995. Ex-Atlantic Spruce of Atlantic Towing Ltd./J.D. Irving Ltd, Charlottetown renamed August 1997. Gross tonnage 397 tons, net tonnage 110 tons, deadweight 580 tons and as dimensions 30,80 x 11,10 x 3,722 metres. Renamed Carl in 2017 and now owned bt J. Johannsen&Sohn, Luebeck, Germany. 

Dutch pilot boat Pioneer 2000-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 June 2017

Netherlands-flagged, MMSI 245711000 and call sign PCGX. Built by Engelaer, Beneden-Leeuwen, Netherlands in 2000. 

Belgian trawler (ex-Linquenda, 1996-, Volharding -2002) Job Senior (Z-201) 2002-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 June 2017

Belgium-flagged, homeport Zeebrugge, IMO 9056193, MMSI 205191000 and call sign OPHS. Built by Scheepswerf Maaskant, Stellendam, Netherlands in 1996. Ex-Linquenda renamed 30 November ? and Volharding renamed April 2002. 

Chinese heavy load carrier (ex-Eagle 1983, Fina Belgica 1983-1993, Sereno 1993-1998, Sereno 2 1998-2006) Zhen Hua 20 2006-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 June 2017

St. Vincent&Grenadines-flagged, homeport Kingstown, IMO 7826180, MSI 375541000 and call sign J8B3502. Owned by Zhenhua Heavy Industry and managed by Zhen Hua Shipping, both of Shanghai, China. Built by Gdynia Shipyard, Gdynia, Poland in 1983. Ex-Agle renamed 1983, Fina Belgica renamed July 1993, Sereno renamed June 1998 and Sereno 2 renamed September 2006. 

Japanese bulk carrier Furness Southern Cross 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 June 2017

Singapore flagged, IMO 9606027, MMSI 564761000 and call sign 9V2076. Built by Ssaiki Heavy Industries, Saiki, Japan in 2014. Owned and managed by Nissen Kaiun, Imabari, Japan. 

Yacht support vessel Game Changer 2017-


Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 13 June 2017

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9778973, MMSI 538071183 and call sign V7WE4. Launched by Amels, Vlissingen, Netherlands on 17 February 2017. 

Dutch tug Sea Alfa 2008-


Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 13 June 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9466271, MMSI 245168000, ENI 02721736 and call sign PHSA. Built by Damen Shipyard Kozle, Kedzierzyn Kozle, Poland (maritime connector) or Damen Shipyard, Hardinxveld, Netherlands (www.debinnenvaart.nl and Seacontractors site) in 2008. For account of Seacontractors, Vlissingen. Netherlands. Delivered in February 2008. Bollard pull 50 tons. Speed 11.0 knots. Gross tonnage 309 tons, net tonnage 92 tons, displacement 350 tons, summer deadweight 220 tons and as dimensions 30,08 x 9,10 x 4,40 (depth at sides) x 16 (maximum airdraft) x 2,90 (minimum)-3,00 (operating)-3,20 metres. Machinery consists of 2-1.672hp Caterpillar. Shoalbuster 3009. 

Dutch steamship Celebes underway from the Dutch East Indies towards the Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 17 July 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 17th reported the departure of the Dutch East Indies steamship Celebes master Wilkens towards Genoa, Italy and Amsterdam, Netherlands.(1)

Note
1. The Dutch steamship Celebes, call sign NJSK, homeport Amsterdam, Netherlands and net capacity 4.268,34 cubic metrs/1.506,72 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Dutch East Indies steamship Karang cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 25 July 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 24th reported the arrival of the Dutch East Indies steamship Karang master Fenenga, coming from Pontianak and Billiton, Dutch East Indies, shipping agents N.I. St. Mij.(1)

Note
1. Call sign TFLJ, homeport Batavia, Dutch East Indies and net capacity 586,12 cubic metres/207,10 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Dutch East Indies bark Peter Landberg cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 25 July 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 25th reported the departure of the Dutch East Indies bark Peter Landberg master Valckenier de Greve towards Benkoelen, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Call sign THCB, frigate ship, ex-Nieuwe Waterweg II, homeport Batavia, Dutch East Indies and net capacity 3.394, 25 cubic metres/1.199,38 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

Dutch East Indies steamship Cheribon cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 25 July 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 25th reported the departure of the Dutch East Indies steamship Cheribon master Krijger towards Samarang and Surabaya, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Homeport Batavia, Dutch East Indies, call sign TCLB and net capacity 1/184,82 cubic metres/418,59 tons of 2,83 cubic metres

Dutch East Indies steamship Gouverneur Generaal Mijer cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 25 July 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 25th reported the departure of the Dutch East Indies steamship Gouverneur Generaal Mijer master Berghuis van Woortman towards Muntok, Palembang and Djambi, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Call sign TDLW, horsepower 135hp, homeport Batavia, Dutch East Indies and net capacity 1.250,04 cubic metres/441,71 tons of 2,83 cubic metres.

Dutch East Indies bark Balgis cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 17 July 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 17th reported the departure of the Dutch East Indies bark Balgas master Said Hoesin Sahab towards Pecalongan, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. The bark Balgis, call sign TBQH, homeport Palembang, Dutch East Indies and net capacity 989,16 cubic metres/349,52 tons of 2,83 cubic metres?

Thursday, 22 June 2017

Greek bulk carrier Blue Marlin I 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 14 June 2017

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 9467859, MMSI 636016501 and call sign D5GM4. According to maritime connector Greece-flagged, homeport Andros, owned and managed by Remi Maritime, Athens, Greece. Built by Zhejiang Zhenghe Shipbuilding, Zhoushan, China in 2008. 

Icelandic container ship Lagarfoss 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 13 June 2017

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport Saint John’s, IMO 9641314, MMSI 305848000 and call sign V2QK5. Built by Shenfei Shipbuilding, Rongcheng, China in 2014. Owned and managed by Eimskip, Reykjavik, Iceland. 

Polish bulk carrier Juno 2011-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 13 June 2017

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 9422378, MMSI 9422378 and call sign 311033600. Owned and managed by Polsteam, Szczecin, Poland. Built by Mingde Heavy Industry, Nantong, China in 2011. 

Japanese bulk carrier Global Bay 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 14 June 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 9512161, MMSI 370560000 and call sign 3FMP5. Owned by Nissen Kaiun and managed by Kyowa Kisen, both of Imabari, Japan. Built by Shikoku Dockyard, Takamatsu, Japan in 2009. 

American Electric Boat Company submarine design Type 8 dated 23 March 1905

An improved type 7P –design. With a length of 80 feet and as displacement 135 (light)-165 (submerged) tons.

Design average achievements of the design on official trials.
In the so-called light condition was the maximum speed 9,5 knots, endurance 60 hours and the range 570 nautical miles. With the cruising speed of 7 knots was the endurance 120 hours and the range 840 nautical miles.
In the so-called intermediate condition was the maximum speed 8,5 knots, endurance 60 hours and the range 510 nautical miles. Cruising speed comparable with light condition.
In the so-called submerged condition carrying the periscope was the speed 7,5 knots, the endurance 3,5 hours and the range 26 nautical miles, at 6 knots respectively 9 hours and 54 nautical miles and with 4,5 knots 30 hours respectively 135 nautical miles/

Armament consisted of 2 torpedo tubes and she carried 4 torpedoes with her. The torpedoes were loaded in the submarine already assembled although still always accessible for maintenance or adjustment. Reloading while submerged and using al  4 torpedoes was to be realized within 4-5 minutes.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T 214.802.

American Electric Boat Company submarine design Type 9 dated 23 March 1905

The type 9 was similar to the type 16 type sharing the same improvements of the type 7-P type. Length 105 feet and a displacement of 227 (light)-265 (submerged) tons.

Average achievements of the design on official trials. The guaranteed achievements were somehow slightly lower. For surface purposes fitted out with a gasoline engine.
In the so-called light condition was the maximum speed 11 knots, endurance 60 hours and the range 660 nautical miles. With the cruising speed of 8,5 knots was the endurance 120 hours and the range 1.020 nautical miles.
In the so-called intermediate condition was the maximum speed 10 knots, endurance 60 hours and the range 600 nautical miles. With the cruising speed of 8 knots was the endurance 120 hours and the range 960 nautical miles.
In the so-called submerged condition carrying a periscope was the maximum sustained sped 8 knots, the endurance 4 hours and the range 32 nautical miles, at 7 knots an endurance of 9 hours and a range of 63 nautical miles and with a speed of 5 knots respectively 30 hours and 150 nautical miles.

In contrary to the 8 was the type 9 fitted out with twin screws and was the auxiliary machinery doubled.

The armament was similar to the Type 16 designs although the number of torpedoes she could carry with her was increased to another two. Strangely enough the E.B.C. did not recommended to do this.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T 214.802.

American Electric Boat Company submarine design Type 7-P dated 23 March 1905


The Dutch submarine Hr. Ms. O 1 built using this design
 

The submarine was called an improved submarine torpedo boat identical with the Adler and Plunger submarines which were built for the US Navy. This design included all modifications used in the Fulton and the ones not applied while the Fulton was already completed. Displacement 104 (light)-123 (submerged) tons with a length. The steel made hull was designed for a diving depth of 300 feet. In practice was actually dived to a depth of 160 feet without deformation. For safety reasons was no cast iron used for parts subjected to pressure while she was submerged.

Fitted out with a 4 single acting cylinders gasoline inverted Marine type with an electric spark ignition. Fired by ordinary gasoline stored in a tank located forward away from all sources of heat. The company claimed that the fuel tank and the pipelines connected with the engine were such tight that leaking was impossible. The electric motor was a waterproof Marine type.

Average achievements of the design on official trials. The guaranteed achievements were somehow slightly lower.
In the so-called light condition was the maximum speed 8,5 knots, endurance 35 hours and the range 300 nautical miles. With the economical speed of 6,5 knots was the endurance 70 hours and the range 450 nautical miles.
In the so-called intermediate condition was the maximum speed 7,5 knots, endurance 25 hours and the range 262 nautical miles. With the economical speed of 6 knots was the endurance 70 hours and the range 420 nautical miles.
In the so-called submerged condition carrying a periscope was the maximum sustained sped 6,75 knots, the endurance 3,5 hours and the range 24 nautical miles. With the economical speed of 4,5 knots was the endurance 22 hours and the range 100 nautical miles. With the intermediate speed of 6 knots was the endurance 7 hours and the range 42 nautical miles.

Tactical diameter is 75 (submerged)-150 (surfaced) yards. Able to dive within 50 seconds.

There were 3 steering stations available, on deck, in the bronze made conning tower and the submarine herself. Just one crewmember controlled the diving station for submerging and controlling the submarine.

The armament consisted of just one submerged 45cm fixed torpedo tube in the bow for which 3-5metres long torpedoes were carried (one already in the tube).


Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T 214.802.

Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Italian cargo ship (ex-Meta 1911-1954) Onice 1954-


Built from steel as a 2-mast schooner, sail area 365 square metres, 137 gross tonnage, 104 tons net tonnage, 227 tons deadweight and as dimensions 27,69 x 7,02 x 2,66 metres. Crew numbered 6 men. Owned by Partenreederei, Brake, Germany, in 1919 as war reparations handed over to France, 1920 owned by M. Valoussiere, Marseille, France, in 1921 fitted out with 1-2cylinder two stroke diesel, sold in 1923 towards Italy, renamed Onice in 1953, fitted out with 1-180hp 4 cylinder four stroke diesel, sold in 2004 to be broken up at Trapani, but intentions changed since then and she is now under reconstruction to be completed around 2018-2010. 

Italian oil/chemical tanker Turchese 2000-

Kieler Kanaal, Germany June 2017

Italy-flagged, homeport Ancona, IMO 9220354, MMSI 247604000 and call sign IBLE. Owned and managed by Finbeta, Savona, Italy. Built by Cantiere Navale Morini, Ancona, Italy in 2000. 

Finnish tug (ex-Aulis 1981-2011) Apollon 2011-

Rauma, Finland 18 June 2017

Finland-flagged, IMO 7927946, MMSI 230178000 and as call sign OIOH. Built by Hollming, Rauma, Finland in 1981. Ex-Aulis renamed January 2011. Gross tonnage 314 tons, net tonnage 95 tons, deadweight 75 tons and as dimensions 30,99 x 10,02 metres. As the Aulis owned by Neste Shipping Oy, Espoo, AB, Nynas Petroleum, Stockholm, Sweden. Converted into a pusher tug by Holming, Rauma in 1990. 

Chinese bulk carrier (ex-Peace Voyage 2010-2013) Yangze Navigation 2013-


Bremerhaven, Germany June 2017

Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9574420, MMSI 538005184 and call sign V7BP9. Ex-Peace Voyage renamed June 2013. Owned and managed by Yangzijiang Shipping, Shanghai, China. Built by Jiangsu New Yangzhijiang Shipbuilding, Jingjiang, China in 2010. 

German container ship (ex-OOCL Neva 2001-2011) Neuenfelde 2011-

Bremerhaven, Germany June 2017

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, St. Johns, IMO 9231846, MMSI 305287000 and call sign V2DO9. Ex-OOCL Nevada renamed November 2011. Owned and managed by Bartels Reederei, Neu Wulmstorf, Germany. Built by JJ Sietas Schiffswerft, Hamburg, Germany in 2001. 

Croatian bulk carrier (ex-Kali 2000-2008) Molat 2008-


Bremerhaven, Germany June 2017

Croatia-flagged, homeport Zadar, IMO 9211559, MMSI 238247000 and call sign 9AA5801. Ex-Kali renamed July 2008. Owned and managed by Tankerska Plovidba, Zadar, Croatia. Built by Tsuneishi Heavy Industries, Balamban, Philippines in 2000. 

Tuesday, 20 June 2017

British light cruiser HMS Curlew (1917) in 1923

Ceres type. Launched in 1917 and completed in 1917. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Ceres (1917) in 1923

A selection of ships'badges of his majesty's Royal Navies published by Gutta, Percha&Rubber, Limited in 1942

Ceres type. Launched in 1917 and completed in 1917. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Curacoa (1917) in 1923

A selection of ships'badges of his majesty's Royal Navies published by Gutta, Percha&Rubber, Limited in 1942

Ceres type. Launched in 1917 and completed in 1918. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Caradoc (1916) in 1923

With our thanks to Novice

Caledon type. Launched in 1916 and completed in 1917. Displacement 4.120 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Calypso (1917) in 1923

Caledon type. Launched in 1917 and completed in 1917. Displacement 4.120 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Caledon (1916) in 1923

Caledon type. Launched in 1916 and completed in 1917. Displacement 4.120 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Coventry (1917) in 1923



With our thanks to Novice

Ceres type. Launched in 1917 and completed in 1918. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Cardiff (1917) in 1923

Ceres type. Launched in 1917 and completed in 1917. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Colombo (1918) in 1923

With our thanks to Novic

Carlisle-type. Launched in 1918 and completed in 1919. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Carlisle (1918) in 1923

Carlisle-type. Launched in 1918 and completed in 1918. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Calcutta (1918) in 1923

With our thanks to Novice

A selection of ships'badges of his majesty's Royal Navies published by Gutta, Percha&Rubber, Limited in 1942

Carlisle-type. Launched in 191 and completed in 1919. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Capetown (1919) in 1923

A selection of ships'badges of his majesty's Royal Navies published by Gutta, Percha&Rubber, Limited in 1942

Carlisle-type. Launched in 1919 and completed in 1922. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Cairo (1918) in 1923

A selection of ships'badges of his majesty's Royal Navies published by Gutta, Percha&Rubber, Limited in 1942



Carlisle-type. Launched in 1918 and completed in 1919. Displacement 4.190 tons. Horsepower 40.000 hp. Oil fuelled all geared turbine machinery. Armament consisted of 5-6” guns, 2-3” anti aircraft guns, 16 3pd guns, 2pd guns and machineguns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Vindictive (1918) in 1923

The HMS Vindictive (ex-Cavendish) as aircraft carrier later converted back into cruiser

A selection of ships'badges of his majesty's Royal Navies published by Gutta, Percha&Rubber, Limited in 1942

Improved Birmingham type. Launched in 1918 and completed in 1918. Displacement 9.750 tons. Horsepower 60.000 hp. Coal and oil fuelled all geared turbines machinery. Armament consisted of 4-7.5” guns, 4-3” guns, 4-3” anti aircraft guns, 1-12pd field gun, 12 machineguns and 6 torpedo tubes (2 submerged).

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

British light cruiser HMS Hawkins (1917) in 1923


Improved Birmingham type. Launched in 1917 and completed in 1919. Displacement 9.750 tons. Horsepower 60.000 hp. Coal and oil fuelled all geared turbines machinery. Armament consisted of 7-7.5” guns, 4-3” anti aircraft guns, 1-12pd field gun, 12-2p guns and machineguns and 6 torpedo tubes (2 submerged).

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

American Electric Boat Company submarine design 203-D dated 23 March 1914

On 23 March 1914 send the American Electric Boat Company (E.B.C.) specialized in building submarine her design 203-D as response on the requirements sent by the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde at Vlissingen, Netherlands dated 19 February. The Dutch shipyard built submarines using designs of the E.B. C. since her first submarine the Luctor et Emergo (later Hr. Ms. O1) laid down in 1904.(1)

The 203-D was presented as a standard design which had excellent results in practice as the E.B.C. claimed. Dimensions were not supplied, the displacement is written down in a pencil note 544,1 (surfaced)-782,0 (submerged) tons.

The speed while surfaced was 11 knots with 70% horsepower against the 12 knots asked for. However with both machines full power guaranteed E.B.C. 14 knots and estimated even 14,5 knots. Wirth a speed of 11 knots was the range 3.150 (guaranteed)-3.500 (estimated) nautical miles. The speed while submerged was 8,5 knots during 3 (guaranteed)-3,25 (estimated) ours., during 1-1,5 hours 9,5 (guaranteed)-10,125 (estimated) hours and a maximum speed during one hours of 10,5 (guaranteed)-11 (designed) knots. With an economic speed of 5 knots was the estimated range 80 nautical miles. The large rudder could be turned very quickly with the available motor to make the smallest turning circle as possible.

Water ballast tankage was 88 metric tons or 18% of the submerged displacement. Reserve buoyancy while surfaced was 111 tons (included 65% of the volume of the superstructure) comparable with a displacement of 27,8% (surfaced)-23,8% (submerged). The submarine was designed for a diving depth of 61 metres/200 feet instead pf the required 40 metres. The ballast tanks used for the hull were tested with a pressure equal to a depth of 51 metres. The two main bilge pumps aft had at each a capacity of 1.288 litres/minute, the auxiliary pump placed amidships had a capacity of 227 litres/minute. So it was possible to free the tanks from water at the surface within 30 minutes. If necessary were the pumps capable to blow the main tanks empty within 45 minutes when the submarine was on a depth of 200 feet.

Personnel accommodation available for 2 officers and 14 sailors and petty officers. To make it livable when operating in tropical areas were the living quarters inside sheated with cork to eliminate the sun heat. Strangely was in this design no provision made for a refrigerator, which was an absolute must for the Royal Netherlands Navy with submarines serving in the Dutch East Indies.

The armament was to consist of 4 internal bow torpedo tubes for which 8 torpedoes were available.

Against additional costs was a wireless telegraph to be installed.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1970 (Municipality Archive of Vlissingen) inv.no. 214.802

Note
1. On 24 July 1914 was the submarine Hr. Ms. K III ordered for account of the Department of Colonies and which was to serve in the Dutch East Indies. Probably the asked E.B.C. design was a preliminary design for this submarine regarded her displacement. The Dutch K-series submarines were for service in the Dutch East Indies and the so-called much smaller O-series for service in the European coastal waters. In the 1930s was that difference diminished.

Monday, 19 June 2017

Singapore oil/chemical tanker (ex-Alga 2012-2015) Maersk Adriatic 2015-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 June 2017

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9636632, MMSI 566429000 and call sign 9V3388. Owned by Maersk Tankers Singapore Pte. Ltd. and operated by Maersk tankers A/S. According to maritime connector and shipspotting the Alga, Marshall Islands-flagged, MMSI 538004769, call sign V7YZ3. owned and managed by Socatra, Bordeaux, France. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2012. According to forums.Clyde maritime renamed Alga 14 April 2015, but was Socatra Ltd. based at Monaco.